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Innovate as if your job depended on it!

Kevin Noonan | Oct. 8, 2013
Today's IT managers are faced with no shortage of competing priorities, each demanding their time and attention. Unfortunately when the pressures begin to stack up, innovation can often be seen as an unaffordable luxury.

Today's IT managers are faced with no shortage of competing priorities, each demanding their time and attention. Unfortunately when the pressures begin to stack up, innovation can often be seen as an unaffordable luxury.

However, the need for innovation is no longer an option. The alternative can be to continue on a dismal, savings driven race to the bottom. Faced with these stark realities, a well-managed innovation agenda is becoming an important part of the savvy manager's toolkit.

Increasingly, managers are discovering that an innovation agenda might not only make way for better opportunities, but also act as a catalyst to challenge out of control systems, springing up in other parts of the enterprise.

Potential rewards need to be measured in the context of each particular enterprise. History is littered with good ideas delivered in the wrong organisation.

The challenge of Groundhog Day projects needing some innovation

In their more despairing moments, experienced project managers may puzzle over similar challenges that continue to emerge over and over. It is as if drawn by some invisible force, complex and unwieldy legacy systems are replaced by even more complex and wieldy systems.

Many organisations are captive to their past, with processes that entrap decision makers into a cycle that keeps on delivering the very outcomes they originally set out to change.

Consider the following example: A large enterprise recently completed a big redevelopment project for one of its core IT systems. Determined to make a break with the past, the enterprise chose a commercial off the shelf (COTS) solution as their starting point for redevelopment. However as work on the project continued, business requirements began to bear an uncanny resemblance to the old system.

Little by little, each set of change requests dragged the system specifications back to something that looked exactly like the old, unpopular system. The result was an industry standard COTS solution, with complex customisations to make it look exactly like the old bespoke system that everybody disliked.

Innovation is about outcomes, not the size of the project
Most organisations can point to a point in time when they achieved something really innovative. Unfortunately for many, all this happened a long time ago. Innovation was seen as a tick on the management scorecard, rather than a longer requirement to keep on pushing the boundaries. Innovation is sometimes seen as too expensive and too risky in a cash strapped IT environment.

Xerox invented the mouse and the graphical user interface. However, these ideas added little value for a document company. Microsoft and Apple quickly recognised the synergy of these ideas with their own core business.

Today, big high profile change programs are no longer a requirement for success. Cloud services, mobile technology and analytics have become the three pillars of agile innovation. Good ideas can be tested quickly and at low cost. Indeed, a number of organisations are having significant success by reusing existing systems and data to inexpensively deliver new innovative services. Big projects can mean big risk, particularly in industry sectors sensitive to public opinion such as government, healthcare and education.

 

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