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HP's Sprout is a double touchscreen PC that makes the virtual feel far more real

Melissa Riofrio | Oct. 30, 2014
With HP's new Sprout, we've literally gone back to the drawing board as far as what a computer can do. Yes, there's a high-end all-in-one PC at the core of the $1900 device, announced Wednesday at an event in New York. But HP extends the Sprout's capabilities by adding powerful imaging and touch technology.

With HP's new Sprout, we've literally gone back to the drawing board as far as what a computer can do. Yes, there's a high-end all-in-one PC at the core of the $1900 device, announced Wednesday at an event in New York. But HP extends the Sprout's capabilities by adding powerful imaging and touch technology.

In a truly innovative stroke, the Sprout includes a second "display" that's actually a touch-enabled surface called a Touch Mat. Think of it as a virtual sketchpad: Using your finger, you can select an image from the main display, flick it down to the Touch Mat, and manipulate it with your hands — no mouse or keyboard required. It's a daring bid to reinvent how we use computers, built by a company that's trying to reinvent itself as well.

Going from thought to experience

HP calls the Sprout an "immersive computing platform."

"We got this notion of going from thought to experience," says Eric Monsef, HP's vice president of Immersive Systems. "What kind of experience could I get with two screens and touch?"

The second screen — on the surface below the 23-inch, 10-point touch display of the PC portion of the Sprout — is the Touch Mat. It's a 20-inch, 20-point touch surface that looks like a huge mousepad. Older folks might liken it to a desk blotter.

The touch technology is embedded beneath the mat's surface. That surface, Monsef says, was designed in partnership with 3M to be extremely durable: "It's scratch-resistant and cleanable, even permanent markers."

The other innovation on the Sprout is the Illuminator, a set of imaging technologies built into an arm that extends over the top of the PC display. It incorporates a 14.6-megapixel digital camera, a DLP projector, and Intel's RealSense 3D camera. The RealSense camera lets the Illuminator take scans of objects that look more three-dimensional than a conventionally scanned image.

Brad Short, a Distinguished Technologist with HP, showed me how all these parts worked together. "To the PC," Short says, "the Touch Mat is a second monitor with touch." HP even bundles an Adonit Jot Pro stylus to use with the Touch Mat (a standard keyboard and mouse also come with the Sprout).

Short booted the Sprout, and it went straight to Workspace, an HP interface that overlays the Windows 8.1 interface. (Short told me that HP had to cajole Microsoft into allowing a direct boot to something other than Windows' own Start screen.) The Sprout will launch with a few third-party apps. The company is releasing an SDK Wednesday, and hopes app developers will find new ways to take advantage of Sprout's capabilities.

For now, we had fun scanning and manipulating images. The Touch Mat is the Sprout's scanning platen, and the Illuminator is the overhead scanner, in a form factor similar to what I saw in 2011 on HP's TopShot LaserJet Pro M275. That product's overhead scanner and scanning surface create 3D-like images that can be printed or saved as image files.

 

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