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How to strike a balance between marketing and tech

Tom Kaneshige | June 11, 2015
The chief marketing technology officer, or CMTO, role is emerging inside companies to help businesses find a happy medium between the opposing natures of marketers and technologists. Here’s how CMTOs bring it all together.

"It was very hard to know how much we could afford to spend in marketing budget or any initiative," Haghighi says. "After using the technology, we have a good understanding of our lead value on what different marketing channels we have."

At the same time, marketers must move fast.

Maureen Duff, managing director and head of global marketing at Pershing, a technology provider and subsidiary of The Bank of New York Mellon, ran into Vestorly's digital content tool at a tech conference. After quickly researching other digital content tools, Duff felt that Vestorly would provide a unique service to Pershing's financial advisory customers.

Duff began plans to integrate Vestorly's software into Pershing's prized NetX360 business management platform, which included meeting complex financial regulations. This was very time consuming. Nevertheless, five months after seeing Vestorly for the first time at the tech conference, the integration was complete.

"I did feel pressure and wanted to move quickly on it," Duff says. "I wanted to be first."

Last year, Monteiro started a CMTO University program within SapientNitro to help a handful of employees navigate the two disciplines of marketing and technology. Students learn how to evaluate marketing tech, drawing a distinction between standard-leaning technology that absolutely requires due diligence and customer-value technology that calls for fast-acting, intuitive decision-making.

"How do you figure out which is which?" Monteiro says. "In some cases, it actually fits both categories. Those are tricky."

Monteiro says CMTO University helps students come up with innovative solutions to these kinds of complex problems. For instance, a CMTO could run concurrent pilots run by the vendors themselves, as a way to do due diligence and reduce costs yet move quickly to see what's working in the real world.

"What you need are people who can fold these two worlds together without going crazy," Monteiro says.

 

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