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How Google Docs' research tool removes drudgery from reports and presentations

Michael Ansaldo | Feb. 9, 2015
You're frantically racing toward a deadline to complete a multi-page report or slideshow presentation, but research is slowing you down. Not tracking down the information so much as the constant bouncing between your work document and web browser, and cycling through the confusing morass of open tabs to find that webpage or image you need.

You're frantically racing toward a deadline to complete a multi-page report or slideshow presentation, but research is slowing you down. Not tracking down the information so much as the constant bouncing between your work document and web browser, and cycling through the confusing morass of open tabs to find that webpage or image you need.

If you use Google's free office suite, there's an easier way — a built in research tool that lets you search for the information you need and easily add it to the Google Doc or Google Slide you're working on without having to leave the page. Here's how to get started.

Access the research tool

Google offers three ways to access the research tool pane. From within a document or presentation, click Tools > Research. If you prefer keystrokes, type Ctrl + Alt + Shift + I on a PC or Ctrl + + Shift + I on a Mac. The third way is to begin a specific search by right-clicking a word (or in the case of a phrase, highlighting it then right-clicking) and selecting Research from the drop-down menu. In each case, the research pane will open on the right side of your document or slide.

Unless you've accessed it via selected text, the first time you open the research tool it will display a list of topics based on the content of your document or slide. But because the tool is just keying in on random words, these results aren't likely to be useful. Instead, type your own search terms in the search bar.

The research tool offers several different types of results: Everything, Images, Scholar, Quotes, Dictionary, Personal, and Tables, each accessible from a drop-down menu in the search bar. Let's look at each search type in turn and how to use them to add information, sources and citations to your document or presentation.

Everything

This is the default search and casts the widest possible net across the 'Net. A typical search of say, a person, will yield a selection of applicable photos, some quick facts, a quotation or two, and a list of website results. Hovering over one of these web results will reveal several action options. Click Preview to open a preview of the website in a separate slide-out window. To add a link to the site to your document or spreadsheet, click Insert Link. To create a footnote citation for that link (document only), click Cite.

Images

To filter only image results, select Images from the drop-down menu in the search bar. Any of the resulting images can be dragged directly from the research pane into your document or presentation. A numbered superscript citation is automatically placed next to the image so you can cite the source. Clicking the image will open options to place the image inline or wrap or break the text around it. In the case of the last two options, you're also presented with a drop-down menu of preset margin widths/depths to choose from.

 

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