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Hope you like Jelly Bean, because you're not getting Key Lime Pie

Jon Gold | May 3, 2013
I'll kick off this roundup by eating a little crow -- I pooh-poohed the notion that Google might not be rolling out Key Lime Pie at this year's I/O conference in last week's installment, saying that I'd still be expecting Android 5.0 to show up in San Francisco.

I'll kick off this roundup by eating a little crow -- I pooh-poohed the notion that Google might not be rolling out Key Lime Pie at this year's I/O conference in last week's installment, saying that I'd still be expecting Android 5.0 to show up in San Francisco.

To my chagrin, however, the evidence pointing to an incremental release instead of a full-on new version of the software has mounted quickly, and it's certainly starting to look like I was dead wrong. Mea culpa.

On to that evidence -- Android Police was one of several well-known Android sites to dip into its server logs and note that it had been visited by devices running Android 4.3 -- not Android 5.0. Android Police also noted that the IP ranges of the Android 4.3 visitors corresponded with known Google employees, which they had used in the past to scope out upcoming new versions of the software.

What's more, the article says, Google assigns version numbers to new Android builds anywhere from a few weeks to "a couple months max" before release -- which means that, with I/O just a couple of weeks away, it seems likely that they'd have seen it show up in their logs by now.

Of course, as we've seen, it's important not to jump to conclusions -- there are still no hard facts about what Google's going to roll out at its big developer conference, so this is all very preliminary. However, the server log information, while circumstantial and inconclusive, does make it look very much like we're not going to see Android 5.0 at Google I/O.

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Careful, root-seekers -- there's apparently a website out there that's offering to root any Android device for a $30 fee. That's right, any Android version, on any device -- root-android.org says it can handle it. (The link provided here is for reference purposes only -- as I'm about to make clear, it's probably not a great idea to avail yourself of the site's services. Also, there's an audio ad that plays automatically.)

Of course, as sites like Android Authority were quick to point out, there's a lot about this that doesn't add up. Getting root access is a process that differs widely among Android devices, and there are plenty of devices that, as yet, simply can't be rooted. More importantly, rooting methods are almost universally available for free, so the idea of paying $30 doesn't make any sense.

Realistically, if you're the kind of person interested in rooting, you ought to be tech-savvy enough to figure out how to do it yourself -- if you're not, rooting is probably not something you should be considering to begin with. I concur with Android Authority and the other sites that publicized this service -- stay well away.

 

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