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Freemium Field Test: Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation turns the spy thriller into a routine shooter

Andrew Hayward | July 29, 2015
Free-to-play games often look appealing, but it's difficult to know at a glance whether the business model is insidious and fun ruining, or reasonable and worth pumping a few bucks into.

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Free-to-play games often look appealing, but it's difficult to know at a glance whether the business model is insidious and fun ruining, or reasonable and worth pumping a few bucks into. With Freemium Field Test, we'll take a recent free-to-play iOS game, put it through its paces, and let you know if it's really worth your time (and money). 

It's easy to get excited about this weekend's release of Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation, especially after 2011's Ghost Protocol pumped some life back into the spy film franchise. Just look at the latest trailer: The bike chase! That car chase! The gadgets! Tom Cruise hanging off of an airplane! It'll be tough to top the last one, but Rogue Nation seems like it's got a fighting chance. 

What about Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation (note the different colon placement), the iOS game? Sure, it has plenty of action: Shooting people, shooting objects, and... true, it's mostly just shooting things. That's well and fine, since it's free and has solid production value, but it doesn't really capture the feel and flair of the source material--plus it's loaded with annoying freemium prompts and limitations. 

The pitch 

There's a reason why the Rogue Nation game feels a lot more like a straight-up shooter than a spy adventure: It's a barely disguised reskin of Glu's existing Contract Killer: Sniper game, all the way from the menu design through to the mission objectives, interface, and gameplay elements. Even the levels are the same.

No wonder it doesn't come across like a natural extension of the rich and interesting Mission: Impossible brand. It doesn't help that you don't play as series star Ethan Hunt or even see him or his supporting agents: He's referenced in text, but otherwise remains out of sight. Instead, you're a rival agent recruited to take him out, but the thin storyline changes direction before long. It doesn't even have the neat gadgetry seen in the films, aside from an automated helper drone. At least the classic theme song makes an appearance.

So it's not much of a Mission: Impossible game, but Rogue Nation is a competent enough cover-based shooter. In some missions, you'll hide behind a faraway perch, popping out to pick off targets with your sniper rifle. Other times, the goal is simply to eliminate all enemies in view while hiding behind crates and walls, using an assault rifle or other heavy weapon to pump lead into generic goons.

Sometimes you'll just need to cause a bunch of damage by shooting cars and crates--that's when the spy premise really goes off the rails. Stealth missions pop up occasionally, but by and large, Rogue Nation is all about aiming your gun and completing quick-hit missions as you pursue bad men across the planet. It all works well enough, but there's little challenge and variety to the missions: the only things that change are the backdrop and your weapons, and it's the latter point that drives the freemium grind.

 

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