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Finding your cultural IQ

Syed Ahmed | April 17, 2014
What's your cultural IQ? Professor David C. Thomas kicked off this year's ‘Learn at Lunch' series at the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) with this compelling question.

What's your cultural IQ? Professor David C. Thomas kicked off this year's 'Learn at Lunch' series at the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) with this compelling question.

Thomas — a professor of international business at the University of New South Wales' Australian School of Business — defines Cultural Intelligence as one's ability to deal effectively with the cultural aspects of their environment.

This is important in an increasingly connected world where we are interacting more and more with people of other cultures. Professor Thomas pointed out that many well-rounded socially and emotionally intelligent people struggle with cross-cultural interaction.

I agree. The good news, however, is that cultural intelligence can be developed using three interrelated elements: knowledge, skills and mindfulness.

Let's start with knowledge. This can mean having an abstract grasp of the culture concept — being aware that others may be culturally different. It also means having knowledge of different practices and nuances of another culture, and distinguishing between personal behaviour and societal norms.

Secondly, there are a few behavioural skills you need to become more culturally-intelligent. People with good "cultural tact" show empathy, can easily relate to other people, can adapt to various situations, and have a tolerance for ambiguity.

Finally, mindfulness is a mediating step that links knowledge with skills. It lets you stop, take account of the situation you're in, recall the knowledge about your context, and then apply your behavioural metaskills to behave in a culturally appropriate way.

During his presentation, Dr Thomas mentioned Nissan Motor Co's president and CEO, Carlos Ghosn as someone who has high cultural intelligence.

Ghosn is largely credited with one of the most dramatic downsizing and turnarounds of a major organisation in the modern business era.

He runs this massive multi-national by splitting his time evenly between Tokyo and Paris, both places steeped in distinct, rich cultures and business customs.

Professor Thomas' lecture resonated with me since I have worked in a number of situations that have required interacting with people with different cultural backgrounds, and reflecting on those situations makes me realise how important cultural intelligence really is.

Many of my work colleagues have come from different cultures, which also provided some interesting challenges.

I once worked with a number of Japanese people. It was my first time interacting closely with people of Japanese background, and I remember getting very frustrated.

We would spend lots of time in deep and intense discussions, which would mostly end in what I thought was an agreement. Later, I would find out that they would renege on that agreement or deny having reached it at all.

After a few of these events, it occurred to me that the reason for this misunderstanding was largely cultural: when they nodded during our discussions, they were just being polite and letting me have my say.

 

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