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Apple MacBook shows off Intel Core M, new battery technology

Elias Plastiras | March 11, 2015
The new MacBook is a 12-inch model that has been re-designed in many ways to improve efficiency and user comfort, and it looks to be better than the Air. Apple claims that it's just a shade over 13mm at its thickest point, and that it only weighs 900g. This has been made possible due to a higher level of integration and miniaturisation.

The new MacBook is a 12-inch model that has been re-designed in many ways to improve efficiency and user comfort, and it looks to be better than the Air. Apple claims that it's just a shade over 13mm at its thickest point (24 per cent thinner than the 11in MacBook Air), and that it only weighs 900g. This has been made possible due to a higher level of integration and miniaturisation.

A key enabler to the thin and light nature of the new MacBook is Intel's Core M CPU, which has allowed Apple (and many other manufacturers) to shed the weight and noise made by cooling fans. The MacBook has no vents or fans, and no moving parts at all, making it a silent operator.

With Core M, power consumption also goes down, and this is also a theme throughout the MacBook. Its Retina screen, which has a resolution of 2304x1440 pixels, also has redesigned pixels that feature a larger aperture. The claimed result is a screen that can consume 30 per cent less energy than previous screen technology at the same brightness level. Additionally, the redesigned screen allows for the lid to be thinner.

Redesigned screen technology has enabled the lid to be thinner.

Other areas of the MacBook that have been redesigned are the keyboard, touchpad, and the battery cells. All have been made to fit perfectly within the dimensions of the notebook and its unibody metal construction. The keyboard has full-sized keys and defines the width of the notebook from edge to edge, while the touchpad takes up the space from the front of the notebook up to the keyboard.

Individual LED lights sit behind the bigger keys.

Both components have new mechanisms that aim to make the user experience more comfortable. The keyboard now uses a butterfly mechanism with a stainless steel dome switch, rather than a scissor mechanism, which allows for a more uniform press and keys that don't wobble when they are hit at their edges. Individual LEDs have been installed for each key, which is claimed to save space, and also to produce a more precise backlit scene.

The new key mechanism on the right is said to provide a sturdier typing experience.

For the trackpad, Apple has done away with the 'springboard' style hinge mechanism of previous models, and instead implemented a 'force' pad that allows taps to be made and registered anywhere on the pad. It detects not only taps, but the force of taps, which opens up new gestures in the operating system — for example, a force tap can preview a file without opening it. Apple's electromagnetic Taptic engine has been installed, allowing tactile feedback to be produced for the taps.

 

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