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AMD reboots server strategy with first ARM chips

Agam Shah | June 18, 2013
AMD shares details about its first ARM server chips code-named Seattle.

AMD

Advanced Micro Devices is building its future server strategy around chips used in smartphones and tablets. The company said its first ARM server processors — which will be released in the second half of next year — will be faster and more powerful than its existing low-power x86 server processors.

AMD on Tuesday shared initial details on its 64-bit ARM chips, code-named Seattle, which will have up to 16 CPU cores. The chips will be up to four times faster and more power efficient than the quad-core Opteron X-series chips, which draw up to 11 watts of power and are based on the x86 architecture.

AMD will sell its first ARM processors alongside x86 server processors, which were also updated with new high-end Opteron chips due next year. But AMD expects ARM processors to outrun x86 chips in the long term.

ARM processors dominate the smartphone and tablet markets today, and have been considered for use in servers processing cloud and Web workloads. Hewlett-Packard and Dell have built prototype servers with low-power ARM cores on which customers can benchmark and test programs.

Observers have said the ARM-based chips could give AMD an edge over Intel, and the move could be as significant as its introduction of 64-bit server chips in 2003, and dual-core chips in 2004. Both moves gave AMD a competitive advantage over Intel, but server chip delays and the failure of chips based on the Bulldozer core ultimately cost AMD market share.

"ARM servers hit the market for real in 2014, that's the try year," said Andrew Feldman, corporate vice president and general manager of the server business unit at AMD.

By 2016 or 2017, ARM CPUs will have 20 percent of the server market, Feldman said. Right now the server market is dominated by Intel's x86 chips, but Feldman said large data centers will start porting software from x86 to ARM in 2015.

ARM CPUs, which are cheaper and ship in higher volumes compared to the more expensive x86 chips, will prevail in the end, Feldman said.

"In the history of our industry, over the past 40 years, smaller, lower-cost, higher volume CPUs have always won," Feldman said.

AMD has been losing server processor market share to Intel, and its Seattle server chips signify a big change in direction for the company. AMD broke its reliance on the x86 architecture in October last year when it announced that it had licensed ARM's 64-bit architecture and would sell ARM-based server processors next year.

AMD's ARM-based server chips will be targeted at single-socket servers and also dense servers like the company's own SeaMicro servers. AMD will start shipping test units of the chips in the first quarter of 2014.

 

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