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All about calendar sharing

Christopher Breen | April 26, 2013
Last week we took a very long look at the workings of Mountain Lion's Calendar application. This week, we'll delve into some of the details. Specifically, getting calendars in and out of the application and how to use Calendar with services such as Google and Yahoo.

Last week we took a very long look at the workings of Mountain Lion's Calendar application. This week, we'll delve into some of the details. Specifically, getting calendars in and out of the application and how to use Calendar with services such as Google and Yahoo.

Export/import business

We'll get to shared calendars in a bit, but now I'd like to discuss copying calendars and events out of Calendar as well as importing these things into the application.

Copying calendars

You've learned how to create calendars and the events within them. But suppose you want to send someone a copy of a calendar or event. It's easily done.

To create a copy of a specific calendar, make sure the Calendars pane is exposed (click the leather bit's Calendars button if it isn't) and select the calendar you want to copy. Now choose File > Export > Export. Seemingly redundant though the command may be, it produces a sheet where you can choose a location for your saved calendar. (A slightly faster avenue is to Control-click, or right-click, on the calendar and choose Export from the resulting menu.) Click the Export button, and you've saved your copy.

The resulting file will end with .ics. This indicates that the file is in the iCalendar format, which is a standard file format that most calendar clients can read.

Exporting an event is even easier. Just drag the one you want to copy to the desktop. This file is also in the .ics format, but  it bears a different icon, which hints that it's a single event rather than a calendar.

You can also produce a copy of all your calendars, including their events and any attached notifications. To do this, choose File > Export > Calendar Archive. By default, when you click Save in the sheet that appears, you'll produce a file called Calendars and Reminders date and time (where date and time is the date an time presented in this format: 4.25.13 3.45 PM).

This is not a file in the iCalendar format. Rather, it bears a .icbu extension (an extension is what we call the few letters that follow the period in a file's name--.jpg, .doc. or .mov, for example). This extension tells us that it's a Calendar backup file (or an iCal backup file if you're using an earlier version of the Mac OS). These files can't be imported by other calendar programs. Only Apple's iCal and Calendar can import them directly. And while we're on the subject of importing...

All roads lead to import

Your fellow coach has sent you a copy of the fall-winter-spring-good-lord-doesn't-this-season-ever-end Pee-Wee soccer schedule. It's a .ics file and you'd love to bring it into your copy of Calendar. Here's how.

 

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