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A year later, Microsoft's Nokia deal isn't a clear winner

Mikael Ricknäs | April 28, 2015
The company has to sell more phones, and attract more big hardware partners and developers.

"You have to be persistent, and invest quite a lot to establish a strong foothold. But it's clear that with Microsoft's ambitions, it's something it has to do," said Francois.

Orange has seen products such as the Lumia 635 and the Lumia 530 -- both of which use the Nokia brand -- sell well, and help increase Windows Phone's market share among its subscribers significantly. To build on that, Microsoft has to work to improve its own brand, according to Francois.

In Finland, many families won't be celebrating the deal's one-year anniversary, following the thousands of jobs Microsoft cut in Nokia operations. At the time, the Finnish finance minister Antti Rinne said that Microsoft had betrayed Finland.

There was some expectation the deal would be more of a joint venture, but it has most definitely been a Microsoft takeover, according to Wood.

However, some of these workers may be able to get jobs next year when Nokia will once again be able to produce smartphones. The company is said to be planning a comeback using Android. For now, though, Nokia is denying it currently has any plans to manufacture or sell consumer handsets.

Meanwhile, for Microsoft, the next twelve months will determine whether the Nokia deal goes down in corporate history as a success or a failure.

 

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