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Divina Paredes | July 22, 2014
Mobile first is fast becoming the default setting in today's organisations. This new environment, however, requires mature planning and execution of programmes around mobile applications and devices. ICT executives from across New Zealand talk about the new business outcomes and challenges in this space, at a recent CIO roundtable held in conjunction with Unisys.

Mobile first is fast becoming the default setting in today's organisations.

In a recent CIO roundtable discussion, ICT executives from across New Zealand discuss how they are leading through the new business outcomes and challenges created by this environment.

The discussion likewise raises the importance of mature planning and execution of programmes around mobile applications and devices.

Here are some highlights from the discussion.

Across generations

David Moss, Vodafone:

We are in a totally connected world — and we're seeing that trend worldwide. There are trials going on in New Zealand, where if you run a red light you'll be immediately emailed the fine based on the personal details associated with your registration.

I don't know how pervasive that's going to be over the next two years, but in some cities in the states, they already do this.

We've done a lot of work recently with the police, rolling out iPads and iPhones to the frontline. The things they can do now which previously weren't possible has changed the way they work, saving thousands of hours.

For example, they'd see someone on the road looking suspicious and previously would go and talk to them, ask for their ID — and if it wasn't a photo ID they'd then have to ring up someone and wait for a confirmation call back.

But now, of course, it's all online, so the photo matched with their name comes back in near real-time so that they can see whether it's the same person or not. And quite often, it's not, which means they can do something about it there and then.

So there are some really simple applications for mobility that are helping our industries be really successful.

Internally at Vodafone, we're just about to roll out Windows 8 across our workforce. The big thing for us is actually working out who we should give devices to. Should we move everyone to a laptop? Should we move everyone to a tablet? And should we have tablet technologies which effectively act as PCs so you can have whatever you had on a PC screen on the tablet natively. So there are lots of different scenarios.

For example, in our retail shop now, we could have a native tablet for the sales person so that when the customer comes in they can actually walk them through a sales process.

Or we could have an iPad kind of technology and deliver it through like an online channel through the web. So now we're finding that we need to build things multiple times, because the technology allows you to do things multiple times.

And of course that just increases, from an IT perspective, the cost of actually building. And I haven't got my head around which ones to back because I can't back them all.

 

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