Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

60 things European legislators don't want Canada to learn about air passengers

Loek Essers | Nov. 26, 2014
Here's one flight delay that European Union citizens might appreciate: The European Parliament has grounded an agreement that would have sent more passenger data winging its way to Canadian law enforcers. And like other flight delays, it could have huge repercussions -- in this case for similar data exchange deals with the U.S. and Australia.

"We oppose all data storage and exchange schemes whose necessity and proportionality have not been demonstrated — as is the case for all of the PNR agreements imposed so far," he said, adding that he hoped that the referral will mean that the "because... terrorism" argument won't be accepted in the future.

Sophie in 't Veld, the liberal MEP who called for the referral of the EU-Canada PNR deal, also welcomed the outcome of the vote. A ruling from the CJEU could provide legal certainty for EU citizens and air carriers — not just with regard to the EU-Canada agreement but also as a bench mark for future agreements with other countries which involve the mass collection of European citizens' personal data, she said.

"Russia, Mexico and Korea and other countries with lower data protection rules are collecting passenger flight information and might want to negotiate their own agreements soon. It should be clear that any agreements, present or future, must be compatible with the European treaties and fundamental rights and must not be used as a means to lower European data protection standards via the back door," she said.


Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.