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4 things you'll love about HTC's One (M8) - and 4 you won't

Al Sacco | April 23, 2014
These days, it seems like every new smartphone is packed with "must-see" new features, often with clever names, meant to set it apart from all the other devices on the market. Those features frequently prove to be less than useful over time. The brand new HTC One (M8) is no different.

These days, it seems like every new smartphone is packed with "must-see" new features, often with clever names, meant to set it apart from all the other devices on the market. Those features frequently prove to be less than useful over time. The brand new HTC One (M8) is no different.

That's not to say the device isn't a great smartphone. It is. But some of the features HTC is vaunting really aren't what make the HTC One (M8) a top-notch Android smartphone — and some are downright useless.

Here's a list of some notable HTC One (M8) features you'll actually appreciate, along with some more that you just might hate.

What You'll Love About the HTC One M8

1) Design and Quality

The best thing about the HTC One (M8) is its sleek, modern design and impressive build quality. HTC makes nice hardware, and the HTC One (M8) is a perfect example.

The device's all-metal "unibody" is slim at just 9.35mm thick, and its 5-inch display is big enough, but not too big, like some other popular smartphones. (I'm looking at you, Samsung.) The display does not extend all the way to the device's four corners; two plastic panels on its front sit atop and at the bottom of the display, and they help cushion the screen from impact when dropped.

HTC's design is not only sleek, it's simple. You'll find only two buttons on the device — one for volume controls and another to power on or shut down the HTC One (M8) — and there are only two ports, a micro USB port and a standard headset jack. Two "Boomsound" stereo speaker sit at the top and bottom of the display, and they "combine with dedicated amplifiers to deliver clear, balanced, powerful sound," according to HTC.

The rear panel of the device is metal, and small raised ridges around the camera lenses protect them from scratches when the handset is placed face up on a desk or other surface.

It's difficult to test durability without using a device for an extended period of time — or purposely trying to damage it — but the HTC One (M8) feels sturdy and built to last.

HTC also packed a large 2600mAh Li-polymer battery into the device's small body. This should provide impressive battery life of up to 20 hours talk time on 3G, according to the company.

2) The HTC Advantage

The HTC Advantage program is basically a free, six-month display protection plan, combined with a live-chat help desk service and a guarantee that HTC will deliver Android software updates for at least two years after a handset's release, to keep the device as current as possible.

 

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