Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

33 expert tips and tricks for iOS 6

Dan Moren and Lex Friedman | Feb. 8, 2013
How well do you really know iOS? Dan Moren and Lex Friedman have assembled a veritable smorgasbord of tips and tricks for Apple's mobile operating system.

Your own private IMDb. You probably already know that you can use Siri to get information about what's playing at movie theaters near you. But Siri's also in expert in pretty much every motion picture ever made. That means you can ask questions about your favorite films, but you can also make Siri do more of the legwork for you when, say, you're curious about which films specific actors have appeared in together. You might ask, "What movies star both Susan Sarandon and Tim Curry?" And Siri will, in turn, reply with both The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Rugrats In Paris.

Get movie reviews. Not sure if a given movie is worth your time? Just ask Siri: "Is Rugrats In Paris any good?" Siri replies with a review from Rotten Tomatoes.

Editing Siri. Sometimes Siri doesn't understand you quite right. Maybe you told it to call your friend "Aaron" and it thought you said "Erin." Fortunately, you can fix Siri's mistake; after Siri reports that she doesn't know what you're talking about, scroll up and find the speech bubble where Siri records what it thinks you said. Then tap that bubble, and you'll find that you can now edit what Siri heard and resubmit your request.

If you don't want to bother typing out a long correction, you can also use iOS's built-in dictation feature to enter your corrected text. Just tap the microphone in the keyboard and speak your text aloud. We'll give you time to make your own Inception joke about using Siri to fix Siri.

Siri can help you post to your favorite social network. If you use Facebook and/or Twitter, Siri offers a bunch of helpful options. You can say "Post to Facebook I love reading Lex and Dan's stuff at Macworld.com," or "Write on my Wall I love Siri," or even, "Post I'm an over-sharer to Facebook." With Twitter, you can say "Tweet I'm eating breakfast" or "Post I'm still eating breakfast to Twitter," along with other, similar variations.

Fun with Settings

Privacy. You don't necessarily want your personal data accessible to every app that asks, and iOS is here to give you the kind of fine-grained control that you crave. Under the Privacy section of Settings you can not only adjust which apps have access to your location, but also prevent them from accessing your contacts, calendars, reminders, photos, and Bluetooth sharing. Plus, if you use Twitter or Facebook, you can decide which of your apps can log in with your credentials. Just tap the appropriate section for any of these and slide the switch for the selected app to Off.

Restrictions. Go to General and then to Restrictions. You'll be prompted to enter a passcode. You can then select which features you would like to lock down on your iOS device. If you're planning to hand the iPhone off to Junior, and Junior has a habit of unintentionally deleting your apps, you can specifically disable that capability from the Restrictions screen. You can also prevent access to the iTunes Store, the iBookstore, Safari, Camera, FaceTime, and more.

 

Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.