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3 power-sipping monitors lower energy bills

Brian Nadel | Oct. 29, 2014
Can you have a great monitor that also scrimps on electricity -- and helps the environment? We test three 27-in. power-saving displays to find out.

On/Off, Volume, Menu

On/Off, Menu, Volume, Mute, Phone

On/Off, Menu, SmartImage

Warranty

3 years

3 years

3 years

Direct price

N/A

$450

N/A

Retail price

$180-338

$348-422

$263-323

       

How we tested

To see how these 27-in. monitors compare, I set each up in my office for at least a week as my primary display. I used each of them to write emails, edit text, create spreadsheets, watch videos, nose around on the Web and work with interactive online programs.

After unpacking and putting each together, I spent some time measuring and investigating how each stand can tilt, raise or rotate the screen. Then I looked over the display's ports, speakers, microphone and webcam. I looked at the monitor's controls and tried out the device's features.

Then I connected each of the monitors to an iPad Mini (with an HDMI adapter), a Toshiba Radius P-55W notebook and a Nexus 7 phone (connecting via a Chromecast receiver). Each screen was able to work with each source; since the Philips display lacks an HDMI port, I used its DVI port with an HDMI-to-DVI adapter.

I next measured each screen's brightness with a Minolta LM-1 light meter using a white image in a darkened room. After measuring the light level at nine locations, I averaged them and converted the result to candelas per square meter. I then displayed a standard set of color bars and compared the three displays using an Orei HD104 four-way video distribution amplifier and a Toshiba Radius computer as the source.

To see how these monitors save power, I looked into their power conservation settings and software. I checked out how flexible the setting was for putting the display to sleep and measured how much electricity each monitor used with a Kill a Watt power meter.

Using the average U.S. price of 12 cents per kilowatt-hour of electricity, I estimated of how much it might cost to operate each monitor, based on the assumption that it was used for 10 hours a day over the work year (250 days) and was asleep for the rest of the time.

3 power-sipping monitors: Test results

 

 

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