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3 power-sipping monitors lower energy bills

Brian Nadel | Oct. 29, 2014
Can you have a great monitor that also scrimps on electricity -- and helps the environment? We test three 27-in. power-saving displays to find out.

How well it worked

In the front, the Philips monitor has a control for fine-tuning the PowerSensor along with others for turning the display on and off and working with the screen's menu. A large bluish-green LED shows that the display is turned on. There are also buttons for adjusting the brightness level and selecting the company's SmartImage feature.

SmartImage optimizes the display's contrast to suit what you're looking at. It has preset modes for Office, Photo, Movie, Game or Economy (which reduces its brightness by two-thirds). There's also an adjustment for the screen's color temperature with six settings available between 5,000K and 11,500K.

With the ability to deliver 221 candelas per square meter, the Philips monitor delivered rich blues and sharp yellows, but the display's greens were too light and its reds appeared dull. Its ability to show video was very good -- clear and smooth with no frame drops.

Loading the included Smart Control Premiere app (Windows PCs only) provides a deeper level of customization. It has the ability to change the screen's black level and adjust the gamma settings. A big bonus is that it has a series of test images that you can use to calibrate the display.

Other features

While the AOC and Dell monitors have built-in speakers, the Philips lacks speakers, webcam, microphone and USB ports. In other words, it is a display and nothing more -- rather unusual in today's market.

Its collection of input ports are oriented vertically rather than the AOC display's more convenient horizontal ports. The Philips has one DisplayPort, one DVI and one VGA port, but no HDMI port. As a result, I used its DVI input with an HDMI adapter.

The Philips does offer the best stand of the trio. With little effort, the display can be tilted forward 5 degrees and back by up to 20 degrees; it can also be raised or lowered by 6.3 in. and swiveled to the right or left by up to 140 degrees.

The entire display can also be easily rotated from landscape to portrait. This is useful if you want to work with a long document or a vertically oriented website without continually scrolling. The monitor's software reorients the image after the screen is rotated.

After pressing a button in the back, you can remove the display from the stand, revealing its VESA mounting holes. This allows it to be used with a third-party stand or mounting hardware.

Bottom line

The Philips display comes with a three-year warranty and starts at a retail price of about $260, between the cheaper AOC monitor and the better equipped Dell display. While I love the display's ability to sense when I'm working and when I'm someplace else -- and the well-constructed stand -- the Philips really needs some further refinement and power reduction before it's ready for my office.

 

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