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Fujitsu will stick with Unix to keep IBM in check, exec says

James Niccolai | Sept. 25, 2013
If IBM gains another cash cow like its mainframe business it will become too powerful, a Fujitsu executive said.

CMI also helps speed up Oracle's RAC (Real Application Clusters) technology, Toyoki said, and he hopes Oracle will use CMI in its own systems. "We're now discussing that with the Oracle engineering group," he said. CMI helps relieve a bottleneck that occurs in scale-out systems even when using high-speed Infiniband interconnects, he said.

Toyoki is also looking ahead to Sparc64 XI, which will likely have more cores, faster clock speeds, and move more software tasks into hardware to speed performance, he said.

Sparc64 XI may become Fujitsu's first server processor manufactured on a 20 nanometer process, Toyoki said. The Sparc64 X and X Plus are 28-nanometer parts, and the newer process would allow smaller, faster transistors.

Fujitsu is usually listed in the top five Unix vendors, but it trails far behind IBM, Oracle and Hewlett-Packard. Toyoki hopes the work Fujitsu is doing to make Oracle software run best on Fujitsu servers will expand his market share. "I believe it will be a big differentiation," he said.

Fujitsu is also exploring three-dimensional transistors, which Intel introduced last year with its Tri-Gate products. The 3D designs help combat electrical leakage at very small scales and extend the life of the standard CMOS semiconductor manufacturing technology.

Fujitsu will likely introduce its 3D transistors at its next process shrink after 20 nanometers, Toyoki said.

Like Oracle, Fujitsu is positioning its machines for big data workloads, which can be processed more quickly on servers with large system memories. This month, Fujitsu will start to offer denser memory chips that will double the maximum footprint on its M10 servers to a massive 64TB.

Asked when the first system will appear with a petabyte of memory, Toyoki said it could happen in three generations of Sparc64. That would be enough memory to analyze some very big data.

 

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