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The tech world in 2017 according to Cisco...

Hafizah Osman | March 9, 2017
According to Bloch, the industry is approaching the end of cloud, moving beyond its phases - from virtualisation, to confusion and to clarity.

The world is moving from a world of data, to a data driven world.

That's according to Cisco Australia and New Zealand (A/NZ) Chief Technology Officer (CTO), Kevin Bloch, who believes such a shift is causing new trends to emerge across the market as a consequence.

"Cisco did very well in building the first generation of the internet, but it’s not good enough," said Bloch, speaking at Cisco Live in Melbourne. "It’s not going to support the next generation of internet that’s required as we start digitising the world and as we move from human to machine scale."

According to Bloch, the industry is approaching the end of cloud, moving beyond its phases - from virtualisation, to confusion and to clarity.

"Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, and Google have all made a name in this space," he said. "Things are settling down now and we are entering phase four – this involves moving intelligence to the edge. We call this fog."

The essence of fog is taking intelligence to the edge, where businesses now take the query to the data.

“What’s so important about this wave is that it’s critical in business because you want developers developing apps for the business, not optimising the back end, which is what has been done the last 10 years," he explained.

“When you write an application that is cloud native, cloud becomes a procurement exercise. Enter phase four – hyperscale and hyperconverged is becoming really big and there’s massive investment going on in those spaces."

In looking ahead to 2017, Bloch cited business transformation as a key disrupter within the market.

Specifically, Bloch said the industry is transitioning from one that was driven by fixed computing, to mobile/BYOD, to the Internet of Things, to now one that is of ubiquitous compute.

“We are now moving beyond the hype of big data," he added. "We’re moving to a point where we need to understand what we’re going to do to compete better. But of course, with these opportunities come a lot of risk."

But Bloch claimed that this move from a human scale to machine scale can result in a double edged sword.

“A Mackenzie study found that 83 per cent of people who are earning less than $20 an hour are going to have their jobs automated," he observed.

"The second risk is cyber – it’s a very significant issue. The third, is trust – as we move into AI, we start going into self service, giving to the rise of algorithmic accountability as mistakes will fall on machines not people."

The next trend he picked up on is the changes in software and Artificial Intelligence (AI).

 

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