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Microsoft, Google make their pitches to unseat Amazon in the cloud

Brandon Butler | April 1, 2016
Cloud wars are as hot as ever.

This shouldn’t be a surprise. Microsoft has been selling to the enterprise for a long time – they know what resonates with this market: Scale, usability and customer references. Google still seems to be figuring out how to sell to big businesses.

Battery Ventures’ Adrian Cockcroft perhaps put it best in his blog recap of GCP NEXT: “I think GCP is making good progress, but it has a long way to go–and if anything, the platform is falling further behind AWS and Azure rather than catching up,” he noted. “They are able to leverage the innovations and scale of the Google mothership for new applications in analytics and machine learning, but AWS is innovating faster in more areas and has huge scale itself, so that’s not enough.”

Despite some customers, like DropBox, migrating away from AWS in favor of Google, it seems like Google still needs more time to establish its enterprise hold in the IaaS market.

Microsoft Azure

Microsoft, meanwhile, continues to put the pressure on AWS. It’s got some uniquely differentiated features. It’s Office 365 SaaS platform is a huge benefit to the company and provides an enormous sales pipeline for selling Azure IaaS to its existing customers. It’s on premises infrastructure named Azure Stack that integrates with the public cloud is unmatched by Amazon or Google.

And it’s not just between these three vendors but other companies are looking to stake their claim in this market too, most notably IBM.

Amazon’s reign

But AWS still looms large over this market. Almost everything that Microsoft and Google spoke about at their conferences AWS also has a product line in. Machine Learning? Check. IoT? Yes. NoSQL databases? Sure thing. Amazon may not be the leader in each of these categories but it shows how tight the race is among these vendors.

The consensus is that neither Microsoft nor Google did anything over the past two weeks to unseat AWS, but it’s clear the cloud wars are as hot as ever.

 

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