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IIIS 2013: The Big Data Drive

T.C. Seow | June 28, 2013
The rapid pace of change in storage technology has not gone unnoticed by both the speakers and attendees at this year's Implementing Information Infrastructure Summit (IIIS), held in Singapore.

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The rapid pace of change in storage technology has not gone unnoticed by both the speakers and attendees at this year's Implementing Information Infrastructure Summit (IIIS), held at Marina Mandarin on 30 May 2013.

Jointly held by Computerworld Singapore and the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA), the forum had no lack of experts to expound on the latest trends on storage solutions, hardware and software included.

PK Gupta, Vice-chair of SNIA South Asia, kicked off the forum by first welcoming the attendees, moderators and speakers for the day. He briefly introduced SNIA and what it represents, touting a growing institutional membership of more than 400. Members come together to foster greater understanding of storage trends, share best practices, and sharing knowledge about the latest hot topics such as Big Data, cloud computing,
400+ professionals worldwide membership.

P.K. Gupta
Photo: P.K. Gupta

Hard disk isn't dead
Next to take the stage was Mark Greenen, President of the International Disk Drive and Equipment Manufacturers Association (IDEMA) and President of consulting firm, TrendFocus. Greenen asserted that "hard drive is not dead. SSDs haven't taken over the world yet. But five years from now, who knows?" That basically set the tone of his talk on what memory makers are struggling with today and the foreseeable future.

Mark Greenen
Photo: Mark Greenen

Clearly, the diversification of computing environments is driving changes in storage use and deployment. "The market for data storage is changing so rapidly that both manufacturers and consumers alike were concerned about the future trends in the storage industry," he said. Looking at the PC and tablet trends, he said that for the period between now and 2017, the compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of tablets will be around 32 percent, while the CAGR for PCs will be less than 4 percent.

In the SSD space, some vendors talk about cached hard disk drives as SSDs. "However, cache SSDs are not affecting [the growth of] HDDs; actual SSDs are the ones hitting the HDDs," said Greenen. "HDD makers will be putting flash onboard to build solid-state hybrid HDDs. When 128GB SSDs become available at very low price—close to that of HDD—then things will get interesting," he added.

For 2015-16, SSDs will mostly be available in low capacities, he said. Exabyte grade HDDs will continue to grow till 2014-15. NAND supply control may temper cost per Gb declines, affecting SSD adoption, while the production of hybrid HDDs needs multi-source capability, he said. The use of cloud services through tablets and smartphones is growing rapidly, posing a potential threat to HDD and SSD growths.

 

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