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Google's App Engine now in business version

Juan Carlos Perez | May 20, 2010
Google is also working with VMware on cloud portability features

"Google still has some hurdles to clear with many enterprises about their comfort level with a bunch of things, but this announcement broadens the availability and appeal of platform-as-a-service and gives people who prefer to code in Java, as opposed to Microsoft .Net Framework, an alternative," Gillett said.

Google still has a lot of work to do to increase enterprise adoption of its Google Apps suite, but App Engine for Business and the VMware partnership give it a Java development framework that professional Java developers can use to create Google applications, said Rebecca Wettemann, a Nucleus Research analyst.

Now Google must grapple with the issue of trust, which isn't a trivial matter. "Google has added more business features and functionality to App Engine, but the question is: Does the enterprise developer trust Google to support their apps? That's what we'll be watching very closely," Wettemann said.

"It's key for Google to tell customers about its product road maps and what it plans to do. That's going to be very important. CIOs like to plan and predict. They don't like to be surprised," she said.

Google's announcements are notable moves to meet the requirements of enterprises, but they won't make Google a household enterprise computing name overnight, said Gartner analyst Yefim Natis. "There is still a lot Google has to prove before it can be considered an alternative to IBM or Oracle or Microsoft," he said.

All eyes will be on whether Google can make good on its 99.9 percent uptime SLA for App Engine for Business, and on how good its SQL support will be in the real world, he said. "The proof remains in the pudding," Natis said. "Google is learning, and this is progress. It's proof they're serious about the enterprise."

 

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