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Dropbox security chief defends security and privacy in the cloud

David Geer | Aug. 7, 2015
Patrick Heim is the (relatively) new head of Trust & Security at Dropbox. Formerly Chief Trust Officer at Salesforce, he has served as CISO at Kaiser Permanente and McKesson Corporation. Heim has worked more than 20 years in the information security field. Heim discusses security and privacy in the arena of consumerized cloud-based tools like those that employees select for business use.

storage warehouse
Credit: Frank Hebbert

Patrick Heim is the (relatively) new head of Trust & Security at Dropbox. Formerly Chief Trust Officer at Salesforce, he has served as CISO at Kaiser Permanente and McKesson Corporation. Heim has worked more than 20 years in the information security field. Heim discusses security and privacy in the arena of consumerized cloud-based tools like those that employees select for business use.

What security and privacy concerns do you still hear from those doing due diligence prior to placing their trust in the cloud?

A lot of them are just trying to figure out what to do with the cloud in general. Companies right now have really three choices, especially with respect to the consumer cloud (i.e., cloud tools like Dropbox). One of them is to kind of ignore it, which is always a horrible strategy because when they look at it, they see that their users are adopting it en masse. Strategy two is to build IT walls up higher and pretend it's not happening. Strategy three is adoption, which is to identify what people like to use and convert it from the uncontrolled mass of consumerized applications into something security feels comfortable with, something that is compliant with the company's rules with a degree of manageability and cost control.

Are there one or two security concerns you can name? Because if the cloud was always entirely safe in and of itself, the enterprise wouldn't have these concerns.

If you look at the track record of cloud computing, it's significantly better from a security perspective than the track record of keeping stuff on premise. The big challenge organizations have, when you look at some of these breaches, is they're not able to scale up to secure the really complicated in-house infrastructures they have.

We're [as a cloud company] able to attract some of the best and brightest talent in the world around security because we're able to get folks that quite frankly want to solve really big problems on a massive scale. Some of these opportunities aren't available if they're not in a cloud company.

How do you suggest that enterprises take that third approach, which is to adopt consumerized cloud applications?

The first step is through discovery. Understand how employees use cloud computing. There are a number of tools and vendors that help with that process. With that, IT has to be willing to rethink their role. Employees should really be the scouts for innovation. They're at the forefront of adopting new apps and cloud technology. The role of IT will shift to custodian or curator of those technologies. IT will provide integration services to make sure that there is a reasonable architecture for piecing these technologies together to add value and to provide security and governance to make sure those kinds of cloud services align with the overall risk objectives of the organization.

 

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