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CERN's data stores soar to 530M gigabytes

Lucas Mearian | Aug. 17, 2015
Since restarting in June after a two-year upgrade, CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been recording about 3GB of data per second, or about 25 petabytes -- that's 25 million gigabytes -- of data per year.

Servers in CERN's Geneva data center
A rack of servers in CERN's Geneva data center, where it stores 160PB of data on disk and tape drives. Credit: CERN

Since restarting in June after a two-year upgrade, CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been recording about 3GB of data per second, or about 25 petabytes -- that's 25 million gigabytes -- of data per year.

Every time the LHC smashes particles together at near the speed of light in its 16 mile-long chamber, the shattered particles fly off in myriad of directions. Those particles leave behind traces in space, like footsteps in snow, which are recorded and later analyzed in a search for the most basic element of matter.

But unlike a camera, which absorbs light in order to produce a photo, the traces that result from particle collisions pass through the LHC's "detectors," leaving many points of interaction in their path. Every point represents an action at a point in time that can help pinpoint the particle's characteristics.

The detectors that record particle collisions have 100 million read-out channels and take 14 million pictures per second. It's akin to saving 14 million selfies with every tick of a watch's second hand.

Needles and haystacks

Guenther Dissertori, a professor of particle physics at CERN and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, said the task of finding matter's most basic particle is vastly more difficult than finding that proverbial needle in a haystack.

"The search for the particle is more than a search for a needle in a haystack. We get 14 million haystacks per second - and unfortunately the needle also looks like hay," Dissertori said. "The amount of data produced at CERN was impressive 10 years ago, but is not as impressive as what's produced today."

Dissertori said CERN's public-private partnerships could solve the expected technological hurdles, including the need for new storage technologies that can save exabytes of data in the future.

Unlike Google or Amazon, two Internet companies that spend billions of dollars every year to develop new technology, CERN has limited money; it's funded by 21 member states and has an annual budget of around $1.2 billion.

"We have to be very creative to find solutions, Dissertori said. "We're forced to find the best possible ways to collaborate with [the IT] industry and get most out of it."

Almost since its founding, CERN has been developing ways to improve data storage, cloud-technologies, data analytics and data security in support of its research. Its technological advancements have resulted in a number of successful research spin-offs from its primary particle work, including the World Wide Web, hypertext language for linking online documents and grid computing.

 

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