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As Intel shifts its focus to the cloud, it commands its PC products to fight—or die

Mark Hachman | April 21, 2016
The PC isn't dead...but it's been backed into a corner.

As part of the process, the company has asked Renduchintala to evaluate which areas of the PC are worth investment. Renduchintala joined Intel last November, as president of a newly created Client and Internet of Things (IoT) Businesses and Systems Architecture Group. Part of his job, according to Krzanich, is to “perform a complete review of all our products,” and to report back in the “near future” about what to do with each one, Krzanich said. 

Krzanich warned that not all products would survive the process. “I’m sure as we’re going through this that there will be some products that we’ll exit from,” he said.

Manufacturing issues give Intel headaches

Separately, Intel is grappling with its inability to keep up with Moore’s Law, which originally predicted a shrink in process technology every two years. Intel’s actual record has varied from 18 to 36 months.

As such, Intel has added a stopgap part, “Kaby Lake,” due to begin production later this year on its existing 14-nm technology. But a leaked memo also points to several new products in development: Kaby Lake and its successor, the 10-nm Cannon Lake, but also Ice Lake (the second 10-nm chip) and two others, Coffee Lake and Glenview, which the memo did not describe. One question will be whether Coffee Lake will be a third 10-nm part, or the first 7-nm product.

The layoffs will have no impact on Intel’s process roadmap, Krzanich said. “I can truthfully tell you that we’re constantly trying to get back to two years,” Krzanich added. 

 

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