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Apple plays customer loyalty, anti-Google cards with iCloud, say analysts

Gregg Keizer | June 8, 2011
It's all about selling hardware, and fighting Android for smartphone and tablet supremacy.

"These new announcements further strengthen Apple's digital ecosystem by providing consumers with increased functionality, enhanced ease of use, greater efficiency and cool new features that we believe will drive further adoption of Apple devices in the future," said Brian White of Ticonderoga Securities, in a note to clients Tuesday.

Although Apple executives rarely mentioned rivals on Monday -- and then only when they touted various Apple advantages -- Golvin read iCloud as a shot at Google and Android. "This is much more than just an additional element to the Apple ecosystem, it shows what Apple already does that provides a tremendous value," he argued.

Golvin was talking about the ease with which iPhone and iPad owners can already transfer their apps, music, photos and other data when they purchase a new Apple smartphone or tablet.

"They talked about how difficult it was to activate a device now through iTunes, but really it's extremely seamless," said Golvin about how a new iPhone syncs with content stored on a Mac or PC. "It takes a while to churn through, but in the end you have everything on your new iPhone that was on your old one."

Android users have nothing like it, he said.

"Apple's fighting tooth and nail with [Android], so anything that tips the scale, like iCloud, is that much more meaningful," said Golvin.

Frank Gillett, a Golvin colleague at Forrester, was more blunt in his assessment. Saying that Apple has now moved into the lead in the personal cloud market, he found the competition lacking.

"Google is worth watching as a number two player, but will struggle to match Apple as it tries to move the world's apps into the Chrome browser," said Gillett in a blog post Monday.

"[And] Microsoft, with no articulated vision for personal cloud and Windows 8 expected sometime in 2012, lags significantly," he said.

White also gave the advantage to Apple as he pointed out the $25 price for iTunes Match was lower than similar fees charged by Amazon and less than what most expect Google to impose for their "music locker" services.

Earlier this year, Amazon and Google launched cloud-based music services that require customers to upload their libraries to remote servers, from which they can stream the tunes to mobile devices and personal computers.

Apple's taken a different approach with iTunes Match, and will instead scan users' music collections and match them against Apple's library. Found matches will be available for instant downloading to the maximum of 10 devices or computers.

 

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