Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Pure says users can upgrade the same all-flash array for a decade

Stephen Lawson | June 2, 2015
Enterprise storage is a long-term bet. Pure Storage, a growing maker of all-flash arrays, is reshuffling the deck on that gamble in a way that might save IT departments time and money.

Enterprise storage is a long-term bet. Pure Storage, a growing maker of all-flash arrays, is reshuffling the deck on that gamble in a way that might save IT departments time and money.

Pure's plan is to let customers keep the same system for a decade, upgrading various components as improved versions come out but never having to migrate the data from an older array to a new one. For some organizations, this could eliminate an expensive and time-consuming effort every few years.

The elements of the new approach have been coming together for a while. But the company formally introduced the strategy and gave it a name — Evergreen Storage — as it unveiled its fourth-generation product on Monday. Evergreen Storage applies to all generations of Pure hardware already shipped as well as versions yet to come.

Introducing a decade-long upgrade strategy may help the six-year-old company make enterprises start thinking about Pure and all-flash storage in a strategic way, a key objective in an industry where well-established, broad-based giants like EMC still hold sway in many IT shops, according to Enterprise Strategy Group analyst Scott Sinclair.

IDC expects the all-flash array market to reach more than $3.3 billion in revenue by 2018, growing at nearly 50 percent per year. But with hybrid disk-and-flash architectures still the norm, all-flash players like Pure may be at a disadvantage, Sinclair at ESG said.

But it's also a genuinely new approach to upgrading storage systems over time, one that's much more far-reaching than past offers by vendors to swap out controllers in existing arrays, Sinclair said. Most of those have been limited to one generational change and are more of a marketing tool, he said.

Pure's approach makes modular upgrades the basis of the company's hardware architecture. It's an approach that's already used with some networking products, such as Cisco's Catalyst series of switches, and in some cases with blade server systems. But it's relatively unknown in storage, a field where so-called "rip and replace" upgrades can have serious implications for an enterprise. Data that's critical to an organization needs to be moved safely from one storage system to the next while remaining available to run the business.

These migrations can require large teams and a lengthy process. Pure says one of its customers, an investment bank, has a team of 30 just to do data migrations for its hundreds of arrays as they are cycled out for the next generation. Keeping old systems running with the company's applications while staging the transfer of data could take months when hundreds of terabytes are involved, IDC analyst Eric Burgener said.

"Generational updates of storage systems with the resulting data migration is a constant and challenging pain point for IT and storage administrators," ESG's Sinclair said.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.