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HPL tackles storage with SAN based solution

CIO India staff | Feb. 5, 2010
<p> The digitised engineering documents from project activities can hit 6TB per year</p>

Bangalore, 4 February 2010 - Kolkata-based Haldia Petrochemicals (HPL) manufactures naphtha-based petrochemicals and is based out of 16 locations and employs 900 people. The company had a SAN in place which was dedicated to its SAP servers. But as the company grew, its SAP servers were not the only ones that were critical. In addition, many of the company's PCs stored data which was critical to key business processes including pricing management, discount management and daily reporting - all of which could be lost in the event of a crash.

Highlights

-- The system came with a mail archiving solution and a three-year comprehensive warranty that ensured there were no additional costs for that period on maintenance

-- Apart from being a data store of the application servers, data on user machines is now protected on the SAN

To make the problem worse, the company's document control centre said that 60,000 pages from 11 functional groups needed to be digitised and stored in central repository. In the meanwhile, the business was under pressure to meet compliance requirements. "We needed all our transactional data and e-mail data to be archived and maintained for at least seven years," says Anjan Bose, Sr. VP, CIO, and head-HR&A, Haldia Petrochemicals.

All of this meant that it was only a matter of time before data outgrew the available storage space. A single solution to address all of these issues came in the form of another SAN - this one would work for non-SAP application servers and mails. HPL installed an HP Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA) 8000 for this project. The system came with a mail archiving solution and a three-year comprehensive warranty that ensured there were no additional costs for that period on maintenance. This system was designed to be fail-proof at multiple levels, with features such as automatic de-staging of cache to the disks in a power failure (graceful shutdown), global hot spare disks that could be used automatically when any live disk failed, each controller having two or more CPUs for redundancy, etcetera.

The project cost about Rs 1.5 crore (US$754,982) and went live in February 2008. With the SAN up and running, about 60,000 pages of documents were digitised and made available through the company's document control centre. The data generated by engineering documents due to project activity is projected to be 6TB per year. Apart from being a data store of the application servers, data on user machines is now protected on the SAN. New servers to be deployed do not need massive storage since the SAN works as a single dedicated backup system.

 

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