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Microsoft is playing Windows hardball

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols | March 23, 2017
Lucky us. Microsoft is no longer supporting older Windows on newer processors.

Is it reasonable of me to expect continued support? Well, when I look at Microsoft’s Windows Lifecycle support FAQ, I read, “All desktop operating system products, whether used for personal or business, receive a minimum of 10 years of support (minimum of five years Mainstream Support and minimum of five years Extended Support) at the supported service pack level.”

But the relevant Microsoft Knowledge Base article states, “Because of how this support policy is implemented, Windows 8.1 and Windows 7 devices that have a seventh generation or a later generation processor may no longer be able to scan or download updates through Windows Update or Microsoft Update.”

Does anyone else see a little cognitive dissonance here? I see grounds for a lawsuit. If I were running a company that had paid Windows 7 and 8.1 licensing fees to keep getting support for a few more years, I’d be ticked.

I’m not sure what the breakdown is for consumer versus business Windows users. But, given how conservative companies are, I’m sure most Windows corporate users are still running the tried and true Windows 7. Now that Microsoft is rubbing the enterprise’s nose into its refusal to support the most popular operating system on the fastest, newest hardware, I see this backfiring on Microsoft.

Microsoft really, really wants to make Windows 7 and 8.x obsolete. Its customers, however, aren’t ready to let go of them anytime soon.

If Microsoft doesn’t budge on this, I see corporate users giving Chromebooks and the Linux desktop more consideration. After all, neither of them will cut hardware support just to make you “upgrade” when you don’t want to.

 

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