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Right to be forgotten applies to all Google domains, rules French privacy authority

Loek Essers | June 16, 2015
Google must respect the European Union's 'right to be forgotten' court ruling on all its sites, not just those it says target EU countries, the French data protection authority has ruled, giving the company 15 days to comply.

Google can determine if a query on the .com domain comes from a European IP address, and already uses this technique to redirects users to local search engines — although it offers users that are not logged in to a Google account a link on the local page to return to the Google.com domain.

Google did not immediately respond to questions about why it doesn't delist search results if the .com domain is accessed from a European IP-address.

Meanwhile, Google appears to block search results made on European search domains made from abroad. From Japan for instance, searches made on .fr and .de domains showed a message that some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe.

If Google does not comply with CNIL's order, the authority will draft a report recommending the CNIL's committee in charge of imposing sanctions for violations of the French data protection law to impose a sanction. The highest possible sanction for the first step ins such a procedure is €150,000, which later can climb to €300,000, the CNIL spokeswoman said.

 

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