Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Prosecutors tighten case against alleged Silk Road mastermind

Joab Jackson | Jan. 22, 2015
Federal prosecutors used chat logs and private journals Wednesday to strengthen their case that Ross Ulbricht is Dread Pirate Roberts, the anonymous mastermind who ran the Silk Road online market.

Federal prosecutors used chat logs and private journals Wednesday to strengthen their case that Ross Ulbricht is Dread Pirate Roberts, the anonymous mastermind who ran the Silk Road online market.

Prosecutors introduced computer files in court that appear to show the laptop Ulbricht was using at the time of his arrest was also used to manage the Silk Road during 2011 and 2012. The files appeared to weaken Ulbricht's contention that he was not involved with the Silk Road during its heyday.

Ulbricht was arrested in October 2013, at a library in San Francisco, where he was performing administrative work on the Silk Road website using the Dread Pirate Roberts account used to manage its operations. Law enforcement officers took the site offline the next day.

Ulbricht created the Silk Road site in early 2011. According to prosecutors, it would go on to facilitate the exchange of $1.2 billion in illegal goods, mostly drugs. Buyers used bitcoins to pay for the goods, which were delivered through the mail carefully concealed.

Ulbricht's defense lawyer, Joshua Dratel, argues that he handed off the site to other operators shortly after he started it. He rejoined immediately prior to his arrest, lured back in by the new operators to serve as a fall guy.

As a result, prosecutors need to convince the jury that Ulbricht was Dread Pirate Roberts for much of the Silk Road's existence -- quite a challenge given that much of the site's maintenance was conducted through anonymous accounts.

On the stand Wednesday was FBI computer forensic scientist Thomas Kiernan, who was at scene of Ulbricht's arrest in 2013 and spent the following months examining the contents of his laptop, a Samsung 700Z running Ubuntu Linux.

Under questioning, Kiernan showed a number of files on the laptop that seemed to link Ulbricht with Dread Pirate Roberts.

The computer had one account on it, in the name of Frosty, which Ulbricht was signed into at the time of his arrest. Kiernan discovered that many of the files under the Frosty account were created at the same time, in May 2012, suggesting that's when Ulbricht may have started to use the computer. Among the files, in a folder called IDs, were images of Ulbricht's passport and Texas state driver's license.

Kiernan examined log files under the Frosty account for a program called TorChat. A log file from April 2012 shows the operator of the computer identifying himself as DPR, an abbreviation frequently used for Dread Pirate Roberts. Additional files showed the user of the Frosty account recruiting help for the site.

There were also journal entries on the laptop that seemed to summarize Ulbricht's previous year. A file marked "2010," last modified in early 2011, describes in detail how the Silk Road came into being. The author hoped the Silk Road would become a "phenomenon."

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.