Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

How to monitor, measure, and manage your broadband consumption

Eric Geier | May 20, 2016
Dealing with a data cap? Tired of getting dinged for busting through it? Learn how to identify the hogs on your network and how to make sure your ISP is delivering everything you’re paying for.

You might not need super-fast speeds for every device or online service, but the quicker any device is served by the router means the more time it has to serve the other devices on the network. Thus, increasing the speeds of just one device could have an impact on the others. The more devices you get faster, the more noticeable the increased performance may be, especially for those sensitive services.

Whenever possible, connect computers and devices to the router or network via an ethernet cable. This helps alleviate the congestion on the airwaves, which is a much more complex and imperfect connection medium than a cable.

For devices that can’t be hardwired, try to utilize router’s 5GHz frequency band as much as possible, as the 2.4GHz band is much more congested and prone to interference. For network clients that can connect only to your 2.4GHz network, check channel usage so you can use the least-crowded channel available. Additionally, ensure you’re using only WPA2 security for your Wi-Fi, as enabling the first-generation WPA (or the even older, insecure WEP) limits wireless speeds.

If your wireless router doesn’t support 5GHz, I suggest upgrading to a dual-band router so you can utilize these faster and higher quality frequencies. Keep in mind, the Wi-Fi devices must also specially support 5GHz, otherwise they’ll still be connecting via 2.4GHz. For computers and devices that can be upgraded to 5GHz Wi-Fi, I suggest doing so. If you have multiple devices without 5GHz, I suggest upgrading the ones with any performance issues first.

Finally, evaluate your Wi-Fi coverage to ensure that your wireless router is placed in the most central spot around where you use the wireless devices most often. If you still regularly have low or poor Wi-Fi signals, consider extending your network.

 

Previous Page  1  2  3  4  5 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.