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Weighing the IT implications of implementing SDNs

Jim Duffy | Sept. 30, 2013
Software Defined Networks should make IT execs think about a lot of key factors before implementation.

"I believe that policy will become the most important factor in the implementation of a software-defined data center because if you build it without policy, you're pretty much giving up on the configuration strategy, the security strategy, the risk management strategy, that have served us so well in the siloed world of the last 20 years," UBS' Brown says.

Software Defined Data Center's also promise to break down those silos through cross-function orchestration of the compute, storage, network and application elements in an IT shop. But that's easier said than done, Brown notes interoperability is not a guarantee in the software-defined world.

"Information protection and data obviously have to interoperate extremely carefully," he says. The success of software defined workload management aka, virtualization and cloud in a way has created a set of children, not all of which can necessarily be implemented in parallel, but all of which are required to get to the end state of the software defined data center.

"Now when you think of all the other software abstraction we're trying to introduce in parallel, someone's going to cry uncle. So all of these things need to interoperate with each other."

So are the purported capital and operational cost savings of implementing SDN/SDDCs worth the undertaking? Do those cost savings even exist?

Brown believes they exist in some areas and not in others.

"There's a huge amount of cost take-out in software-defined storage that isn't necessarily there in SDN right now," he said. "And the reason it's not there in SDN is because people aren't ripping out the expensive under network and replacing it with SDN. Software-defined storage probably has more legs than SDN because of the cost pressure. We've got massive cost targets by the end of 2015 and if I were backing horses, my favorite horse would be software-defined storage rather than software-defined networks."

Sackman believes the overall savings are there in SDN/SDDCs but again, the security uncertainty may make those benefits not currently worth the risk.

"The capex and opex savings are very compelling, and there are particular use cases specifically for SDN that I think would be great if we could solve specific pain points and problems that we're seeing," he says. "But I think, in general, security is a big concern, particularly if you think about competitors co-existing as tenants in the same data center -- if someone develops code that's going to poke a hole in the L2 VPN in that data center and export data from Coke to Pepsi.

"We just won a proposal for a security operations center for a foreign government, and I'm thinking can we offer a better price point on our next proposal if we offer an SDN switch solution vs. a vendor switch solution? A few things would have to happen before we feel comfortable doing that. I'd want to hear a compelling story around maturity before we would propose it."

 

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