Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Is moving out of the data centre a good move?

Zafirah Salim | Feb. 11, 2015
In this interview, David Meredith, Senior Vice President of CenturyLink, shares his thoughts on some of the key issues that businesses today face with data centre operations, as well as major trends and predictions for the data centre industry for 2015.


David Meredith, Senior Vice President of CenturyLink

A recent IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Data Centre 2015 Predictons report revealed that 60 percent of the data centre-based IT assets that organisations rely on to conduct business and deliver services will be in colocation, hosting, and cloud data centres by 2017.

In addition, over the next two years, over 60 percent of companies will stop managing most of their IT infrastructure, relying on advanced automation and qualified service partners to boost efficiency and directly tie data centre spend to business value, according to the report. 

With more CIOs moving out of the data centres and outsourcing that part of their IT operations, there will be an increased focus on cloud enabling the Internet of Things (IoT), where it becomes instrumental in enabling remote data storage and allowing for operations in multiple locations.

David Meredith, Senior Vice President of CenturyLink, shares his thoughts on some of the key issues that businesses today face with data centre operations, as well as major trends and predictions for the data centre industry for 2015.

For starters, can you give us a brief idea of some of the key issues that businesses today face with regards to data centre operations?                  

Businesses are realising that the best technology and design alone will not result in an efficient, high-quality data centre. To achieve data centre greatness, it takes an organisation of experienced, well-trained people with a rigorous adherence to standards and methods.

In addition to ensuring the quality of those staffing the data centre, these businesses are re-examining their preventative maintenance programs and processes, operating conditions, and planning, management and coordination practices.

As companies look to reduce costs for building and maintaining data centres, colocation becomes an increasingly popular alternative. Besides cost savings, what are some other benefits of colocation for businesses?

It's important to know what to look for in a colocation provider, whether it's an improved customer experience, 100 percent uptime for critical applications or better alignment of IT with business priorities.

Moving from on-premise to colocation services also gives many organisations access to additional services, like cloud and managed services. Businesses also benefit from the colocation provider's connectivity options, security best practices and support services, as well as compliance with regulatory requirements.

Selecting the right provider for colocation affords you the ability to meet the needs of your business now and in the future, as organisational and market conditions change.

What do you think are some primary things that businesses should look out for when seeking a colocation provider?

We feel strongly that businesses should look for colocation providers that adhere to the Uptime Institute's standards for both the building itself and the provider's management and operations.

 

1  2  3  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.