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VMWorld 2014: Winners and Losers

Brandon Butler | Sept. 3, 2014
VMWorld 2014 was a whirlwind. The conference last week attracted 22,000 attendees, more than 250 exhibitors and spread across all three buildings of the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco over a five-day period.

VMWorld 2014 was a whirlwind. The conference last week attracted 22,000 attendees, more than 250 exhibitors and spread across all three buildings of the Moscone Center in downtown San Francisco over a five-day period.

There was a lot of news at the show: From VMware announcing new products like EVO:RAIL, the hyper-converged infrastructure stack, to the company pledging support for OpenStack and containers in its software. Almost all of the vendors at the show had their own news, too -- it was hard to keep track of it all.

To boil it down, Network World put together a list of "Winners and Losers" from VMWorld. But please, take it with a grain of salt. We're not looking to call anyone a "loser," but, after talking with analysts, partners, customers and VMware officials, there are some areas of significant new importance for VMware, and others where Network World, and the broader VMware community, would have liked to see some more action and details.

Winners
End User Computing (EUC) Division
VMware made a big push for its End User Computing (EUC) division at VMWorld. The group has made some big news in the past year - bringing on new executives like Sanjay Poonen from SAP and making the largest acquisition in company history when VMware bought AirWatch for $1.4 billion earlier this year.

At VMWorld 2014, the EUC division was front and center. Poonen took the prime-time spot of the second-day keynote to make the case that just as VMware wants to manage the data center and cloud with its software, it wants to orchestrate delivery of applications to mobile end users too. It provides a range of virtual desktops (Horizon), mobile device management (AirWatch) and desktop virtualization software. VMware is getting hip too: It announced a partnership with Google and NVIDIA to bring hefty graphic processing power to virtual desktops and Chromebooks.

It makes sense that VMware would look to boost its EUC division - mobile represents a tectonic shift in the IT industry and AirWatch is a leading enterprise mobile management software provider. VMware is looking to extend its reach beyond just server, network and cloud management and get into mobile management in a big way.

Containers
One of the hottest buzzwords and topics of discussion among developers over the past year has been "containers". Instead of slicing hardware servers into virtual machines, it virtualizes the operating system to run applications in "containers," which allow for easier portability between virtual machines and even over to non-virtualized hardware. Some believe containers could become VM killers.

VMware, which still makes boatloads of money off of its vSphere compute virtualization software, took on that issue directly at VMWorld. The company said that the best way to manage containers is using VMware software. In doing so it announced partnerships with container management company Docker and Google, which has a newly open sourced project named Kubernetes for managing containers.

 

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