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Solving data management challenges in the era of BYOD and IoT

Mark Bentkower, Director of Systems Engineering,ASEAN, CommVault Systems | March 10, 2015
The main challenge for IT organisations in 2015 lies in the collection, aggregation and analysis of different sources of data. Here are the top strategic ways to solve the organisations' data management challenges.

This vendor-written piece has been edited by Executive Networks Media to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favour the submitter's approach.

Mark Bentkower, Director of Systems Engineering,ASEAN, CommVault Systems
Mark Bentkower, Director of Systems Engineering,ASEAN, CommVault Systems

The forces driving data growth are everywhere: greater workforce mobility, massive adoption of smartphones and tablets, the Internet of Things (IoT), and widespread use of social media and cloud computing. These factors are complicating data management approaches, making it even more challenging for IT to keep up with business demands, and the growing pressure for regulatory compliance. The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) trend is expected to escalate in 2015, while IoT adoption in Asia Pacific is projected to grow to US$57.96 billion by 2020[1], adding to spiraling IT complexity and never-ending demand for storage capacity. This in turn also forces up costs, putting IT in rough terrain when it comes to budgeting and management.

In this climate of unprecedented data growth, conventional approaches to backup and recovery are failing. Looking at 2015 and beyond, the main challenge for IT organisations lies in the collection, aggregation and analysis of different sources of data. Here are the top strategic ways to solve the organisations' data management challenges.

1)     Manage redundant data

IT administrators often struggle with having little to no insight on the content and type of data that is being created; limited control over how it is being stored; and almost no understanding of its business value. When it comes to information lifecycle governance, more often than not, organisations choose to lean on 'cold storage' tape vaults to keep every scrap of data due to a paralysing fear that something of value may be deleted.

Recent studies suggest that 69 percent of a company's stored data has absolutely no value to the organisation.[2] In essence, this means that organisations could be spending up to 20 percent of their annual budget on storing data that has gone stale, with virtually no ROI[3]. We can only expect this number to increase with the current massive data growth generated by BYOD and IoT trends.

Modern data protection strategies should be global in nature, instead of operating in silos. Stale data should be identified and moved to the proper tier of storage taking into account recovery time objectives and cost per GB to store it. This should in turn, reduce the size of backup windows. Redundant data should be eliminated at the source, without transmitting it over the network. By using software-based, source-side deduplication, organisations can reduce network traffic from backups and maximise efficiency, while still ensuring security and recoverability.

 

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