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Roundtable: What's next for virtualisation?

Jennifer O'Brien | Feb. 19, 2013
This roundtable discussed trends in virtualisation and the walk towards Cloud computing, and how resellers can help customers benefit from the next wave of technological advance.

With Australia leading the global adoption rate for virtualisation, tomorrow's IT organisation will spend a lot less time building and maintaining technology assets and a lot more time orchestrating services and enabling the business to consume them effectively in its operations, decisions, and innovations. This roundtable discussed trends in virtualisation and the walk towards Cloud computing, and how resellers can help customers benefit from the next wave of technological advance.

Jennifer O'Brien (JO): There has been a lot of market transition in terms of virtualisation. Where are the market opportunities as we transition to solution selling?

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Allan King, Infront Systems (AK): For us it's more around IT transformation. That is taking the next step up the stack, away from standard hypervisor virtualisation, and looking at a more holistic, private Cloud strategy to enable customers to be more flexible and to automate where possible.

We define it as an 'above the line' and 'below the line' engagement. Below the line is the traditional hardware, datacentre, SI integration play. Above the line is where it becomes challenging because you step out of the technology stack and into more of a procedural, operational play, which means that you've got to engage the customer in change. That's very, very difficult because customers generally don't like change or are not adopting that change as readily as we, the industry, would like. What we're doing is persisting, constant messaging, and making sure that we continue to align our message with our key partners and vendors.

JO: Are you finding the conversations changing, and the people you're targeting are no longer the IT people but more the CIOs?

AK: It's a broader conversation across the entire organisation. Obviously, with the CIO from a visionary perspective, but even as you move more towards converged infrastructure, you're no longer talking in silos, so trying to corral, and get a single message and a single focus from an organisation doesn't always play to the politics, but what we're seeing now in the last three to six months is industry's message is resonating. People are now saying they're interested and willing, and it's now just taking them on the 'journey' to try and execute on what the vision is. For us, it's virtualise, consolidate and automate.

JO: What is the target market and where are partners looking for opportunities?

Matthew Barry, Data#3 (MB): Our target market would be, in today's challenging environment, absolutely everywhere. The opportunities that we're going after are mostly chasing private Cloud and the management of datacentre infrastructure. We're probably also having a hard push on VDI, virtual desktop, bring your own device (BYOD), and mobility. Our approach is multilayered, in that we're trying to talk to everybody within the organisation at different levels. In testing times, it's back to basics in this industry. Have a plan. Stick to the plan. And the most important thing is, if you're going to invest the time in going after an opportunity, then you've got to give it 100 per cent. If you're not giving it 100 per cent, you're probably wasting money.

 

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