Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Q&A: Big Data has to be fast

Zafar Anjum | July 23, 2013
Big data is irrelevant unless results come fast, says Patrick Lo, Regional Marketing Senior Manager for the CE & Datacenter Division, WD Asia Pacific. He also elaborates on storage trends in the region.

Patrick Lo

Patrick Lo, Regional Marketing Senior Manager for the CE & Datacenter Division, WD Asia Pacific

Big data is irrelevant unless results come fast, says Patrick Lo, Regional Marketing Senior Manager for the CE & Datacenter Division, WD Asia Pacific. He also elaborates on storage trends in the region.

Big data is the latest buzz word in the tech community. Has it affected your business in any way so far?

Big data and storage solutions are inextricably linked. Today, the sheer volume of data deluge led Gartner's Managing VP, Daryl Plummer, to note that the velocity of data today is greater than the sum of our ability to analyse that data and make decisions from it.

It's no longer enough for data to be big, but it also has to be fast.  In today's competitive business landscape, businesses need to gain insights faster than their competitors in order to stay relevant and ahead of the curve. Essentially, big data is irrelevant unless results come fast.

One of the main causes of this slowdown can be traced to storage. Disk storage, a long-time stalwart of IT, is no longer capable to the analysis challenge of big data. At Western Digital, we understand the needs of our customer and the industry at large and are constantly innovating to ensure our products meet the needs of our customers. For example, WD recently announced the world's thinnest 1 TB 2.5-inch WD Blue hard drive and 5mm 2.5-inch WD Black solid state hybrid drives (SSHD). In the enterprise space, we are offering the elemental building blocks for every data centre with our WD Xe for high-density performance storage for demanding applications; WD Re for high-availability deployments; and WD Se for scale-out architectures.

What are the main storage trends in the Asia Pacific region? How have they changed or evolved over the years?

Amongst the various storage trends in the APAC region, I believe the Solid State Drives (SSDs) and Hard Disk Drives (HDDs) discussion is one of the major talking points. SSDs have emerged and gained significant momentum over the past five years.

My perspective on this discussion is that both technologies are not competitors but are synergistic. They each have its own pros and cons and will continue to complement each other to enable new devices and applications in both the consumer and enterprise space. In one of our latest studies, it suggests that 75 percent of data in 2020 will still be stored in hard disk drives, further reinforcing the position that these two technologies will create new opportunities over the next decade.

How are these changes going to affect the storage business?

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.