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Oracle M2M platform supports Hughes Telematics for automotive monitoring and e-health

Sophie Curtis | March 6, 2013
Hughes Telematics, which provides in-vehicle telematics systems, is using a machine-to-machine (M2M) platform based on Oracle's Unified Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Billing and Revenue Management (BRM) solution to expand into new markets.

Hughes Telematics, which provides in-vehicle telematics systems, is using a machine-to-machine (M2M) platform based on Oracle's Unified Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and Billing and Revenue Management (BRM) solution to expand into new markets.

Hughes Telematics, which was acquired by Verizon last year, offers a portfolio of location-based services for consumers, manufacturers, fleets and dealers through two-way wireless connectivity.

This includes remote vehicle diagnostics, an integrated GPS tracking and monitoring system for wireless fleet vehicle management, and an after-market solution for vehicles that don't have embedded telematics capabilities.

Its customers include Mercedes-Benz, Volkswagen and US insurance firm State Farm - which offers usage-based insurance packages based on actual driving habits, and also provides stolen vehicle location assistance, driving reports and a mobile personal emergency response system (MPERS).

All of the information collected by the in-vehicle telematics systems is fed back to a central platform consisting of an Oracle Siebel CRM and Oracle E-Business Suite, which processes the data and distributes it to whoever needs it - be that the consumer, insurance company or emergency services.

The integrated solution also consists of Oracle Fusion Middleware components including Oracle Application Integration Architecture for Communications and Oracle SOA Suite, as well as Oracle Contact Center Anywhere and Oracle Business Intelligence Enterprise Edition.

The Oracle Billing and Revenue Management (BRM) solution is used to handle subscriptions and support variable billing models in countries around the world.

"Oracle was chosen because it was the most capable off-the-shelf software and globally supportable. So we paid for that global license to be able to deploy anywhere. That's really important," said George Ayres, VP of Global Sales at Hughes Telematics.

"Five years ago, car makers were thinking about the market. Not any more. They want one service provider that can go anywhere, because they make their cars that way now. Because it costs too much to try and localise."

As the platform is built on open standards, application developers are able to incorporate new data sources, such as traffic information, weather news, and local information to build new customer services.

For example, if two people are in their cars on opposite side of town and decide to meet for lunch, an app could be developed that would allow the two cars to communicate their relative positions and find a restaurant that is half way between, while mapping the quickest to get there.

"Services like roadside assistance - you and I hope to never use them. So at some point we ask ourselves why are we paying for them? You get offered a free year of telematics and then how many people actually subscribe?" said Joshua Aroner, VP of global marketing at Oracle.

 

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