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OpenStack Board Member Rob Hirschfeld on the impact of DevOps, SDN, Docker & more

Art Fewell | Feb. 26, 2015
I recently had the great pleasure to sit down with community-elected OpenStack board member and Crowbar co-creator, Rob Hirschfeld. Rob shared awesome nuggets of wisdom on data center and cloud operations, you can view the video and the full transcript below:

I recently had the great pleasure to sit down with community-elected OpenStack board member and Crowbar co-creator, Rob Hirschfeld. Rob shared awesome nuggets of wisdom on data center and cloud operations, you can view the video and the full transcript below:

Art Fewell: Welcome to Open Networking TV. This is Catch Up, I'm your host Art Fewell. Today we will be catching up with the OpenStack guru, Rob Hirschfeld.

Rob Hirschfeld: Good to see you, thanks you for having me on.

Art Fewell: I'm really grateful that we can have somebody with such influence and expertise. Just a little background about Rob, he's been one of the guys with OpenStack before it was OpenStack and helping to create the very, very cool entity that it has become.

Could you give us a little more of your background and your experience getting started with OpenStack.

Rob Hirschfeld: Sure, I'd be happy to. I joined Dell to help build scale-out cloud solutions, but way before OpenStack. Back in the days, Eucalyptus and Joyent and when platform as a service was a hot buzz word. The first time it was a hot buzz word I guess.

We'd been trying to get this hyper scale hardware to build solutions on it. What would happen is we would start partnering with a company and then more than half of the time these companies would get bought. They'd be little startups and they get bought.

We got to a point where partnering with a startup was really hard, but partnering with an open source project actually gave us a lot more influence and control.

Just one of the things, to me, open source is not about the money side of it, right? A lot of people think, "Oh, it's free software!" It's not free software. There's investment and learning and operational things and a lot of times people buy software support from a vendor. It's really about control and transparency.

Then we got into OpenStack, because we needed and wanted the control and transparency that would come from the community 'cause we didn't want it being bought out from under us, we wanted to invest our time and that we could be part of and would be sustained and transparent to the community.

The other thing that came out of that for us was that we started really with an operational focus. While I've been in OpenStack in the community for a long time I've really come at it from an operational perspective and what it takes to operate clouds. I really don't contribute on the development side — there's a lot of excitement and buzz around the size of the development community.

 

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