Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Liberty Reserve indicted for $6 billion in money laundering

Joab Jackson | May 29, 2013
Almost all of Liberty Reserve's business was illegal in nature, US law enforcement officials assert.

From 2006, the company processed more than 55 million transactions and transferred more than $6 billion in illegal funds, according to the DOJ. The company did not register itself with the DOJ as a money transferring business.

The DOJ charged that Budovsky and his co-conspirators "intentionally created, structured, and operated Liberty Reserve as a criminal business venture, one designed to help criminals conduct illegal transactions and launder the proceeds of their crimes," according to the indictment. In particular, the service was maintained so that individual transactions would be anonymous and untraceable.

Liberty Reserve did not accept transfers of money itself directly from its users. Instead, customers deployed pre-approved third party exchangers, which would buy and sell in bulk a Liberty Reserve currency called LR. Because Liberty Reserve was not keeping track of end users, it provided a layer of anonymity in its transactions. In addition to the Liberty Reserve fee, exchangers would also charge fees, which in many cases would run to 5 percent or more of the amount being transferred, which was more costly than most legal payment processors and banks.

"By providing layers of anonymity, the company allowed users to engage in illegal transactions that wouldn't have been possible in legitimate financial systems," Bharara said. "Users routinely and brazenly established accounts under fictitious names."

Liberty Reserve had become a financial hub for a wide range of illegal activities, including credit card theft, identity fraud, investment fraud, computer hacking, child pornography and narcotics trafficking, the DOJ charged. Even after the DOJ started investigating Liberty Reserve in 2011, the organization continued to operate under the guise of a number of shell companies located in Cypress, Hong Kong, Russia, China, Morocco and other countries.

Because of the way Liberty Reserve operated, almost all of the activity on the service was illegal in nature, the law enforcement executives maintained. "Task force agents investigating the case determined that almost all of the transactions where Liberty Reserve currency was used involved illegal activity," said James Hayes, the ICE special agent in charge of the New York field office, at the press conference. Those who were using the service for legitimate, non-illegal activities can call the DOJ in order to see if they can have any money held by the company returned. "We'll do the best we can to get their money back," Bharara said.

The name of the judge presiding over the case has been redacted, in case of any attempted "personal retaliation" that might arise from the case, according to Bharara.


 

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for CIO Asia eNewsletters.