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How to use video to improve IT recruiting

Sharon Florentine | July 14, 2015
Sure, video killed the radio star, but the technology is breathing new life into inefficient, time-consuming and stale recruiting practices and allowing organizations to cut time-to-hire while increasing talent quality.

video interviewing strategy

Sure, video killed the radio star, but the technology is breathing new life into inefficient, time-consuming and stale recruiting practices and allowing organizations to cut time-to-hire while increasing talent quality.

Video in your pocket

Demand for greater video integration in B2B communication platforms is accelerating rapidly, driven by the prevalence of consumer applications like FaceTime and Skype and by the availability and affordability of cloud infrastructure, says Craig Malloy, CEO of unified communications, collaboration and video solutions firm LifeSize.

"Video used to require massive on-site infrastructure and dedicated real-estate in a data center. It used to be clunky, unreliable and very expensive. But the ability to make video calls from your pocket or your purse -- with consumer apps like FaceTime -- means that your workforce expects that capability in the enterprise space, too. These video capabilities are further enhanced by the availability and affordability of high-performance cloud infrastructure," Malloy says.

And while many organizations have been leveraging video technology to communicate and collaborate within their organizations, or using video to augment marketing and sales functions, using video as a human resources recruiting and sourcing tool is a relatively novel application of the technology, though it's rapidly gaining traction.

What used to require a phone screening and an in-person, on-site interview is now accomplished with an initial video interview, reducing time to hire and improving hiring managers' ability to gauge the right fit, Malloy says. "You get a much better sense of who that candidate is using video rather than trying to guess based on their paper resume and a phone conversation. It also cuts down our time-to-hire, because video interviews are easier and less complicated to schedule -- no travel time, no coordinating with hiring managers' time off, or candidates existing work schedules," he says.

Demonstrate your edge

A video interview doesn't have to be done live, either, says Chris Brown, director of HR at unified communications firm InterCall, and head of human resources for InterCall's parent company, West Corporation. Candidates can record their own introduction video, attach it to the rest of their digital application, and have that entire package delivered to hiring managers and decision makers simultaneously.

Video can also provide a window into your company's culture or organizational structure, explaining why a candidate should apply, or outlining what a specific role will entail in a much more engaging format than a bulleted list on your careers site, says Alys Scott, CMO and senior vice president of marketing communications at talent management solutions firm Peoplefluent. You're also demonstrating that you're on the cutting edge of technology.

"You're automatically saying something about your organization and culture just by using video in the first place. Especially when you're hiring millennials, this is a huge competitive advantage if you're using the same technology at work that they're using on their personal devices," Scott says.

 

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