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How Big Data can help retailers optimize mobile

Thor Olavsrud | July 16, 2013
Delivering a dynamic and engaging mobile experience is becoming essential to retailers, and big data marketing applications company BloomReach believes that its new big data application is the key.

"With the cross-channel optimization, if we've identified the user, we can tell you what the mobile user bought when they went to the desktop," Kaufman says.

"Over 50 percent of people we identify go to the same category page in both places. And over 30 percent go to the exact same product," she adds. "Often they'll discover on the mobile phone and buy on the desktop or go into the store."

Avoid the Creepy Factor by Discerning Intent

Of course, the danger of such targeting is in making the customer feel spied upon. But Kaufman says retailers can avoid the "creepy factor."

"When you give somebody what they want, they appreciate it," Kaufman says. "When you try to infer what they want based on who they are, they're offended. Who says I'm shopping for me? Intent is everything. And the problem is that it's hard to discern. You have to understand language and behavior. We've built a system that's able to hone in on the scent of intent. The scent of intent is a really good thing to be able to inform what content you show me. Then give me the ability to naturally refine it."

To hone in on that "scent of intent," BloomReach collects data from 150 million web pages and more than a billion consumer interactions. When a client signs on, BloomReach deploys a pixel on the customer's site and then simply listens for a period of 14 to 30 days while performing a deep crawl of the site.

Once that period is done, BloomReach mobile is capable of automatically creating personalized dynamic categories that group products relevant to a shopper based on shared attributes like brand, color, style, category, or even a shopper's preference for on-sale items, pins and likes.

As Kaufman likes to say, Crayola has a color library of 164 colors. BloomReach has a color library of 1,100.

 

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