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Dealing with data

Zafar Anjum | May 27, 2013
The explosive growth of data in Asia provides both opportunities and challenges, says Jeetu Patel, vice president and general manager of the Syncplicity Business Unit, Information Intelligence Group (IIG) at EMC.

Jeetu Patel

The explosive growth of data in Asia provides both opportunities and challenges, says Jeetu Patel, vice president and general manager of the Syncplicity Business Unit, Information Intelligence Group (IIG) at EMC.

Tell us about IIG in EMC. What does this division do?

EMC's IIG Information Intelligence Group (IIG) offers enterprises software and solutions that solve complex information and content management challenges, enabling organisations to make insightful decisions and intelligently transform information into business value.

The relevance of the IIG solutions comes at a time when organisations face unprecedented growth in data and variety of information, presenting a significant business problem. IDC's Digital Universe study, "Big Data, Bigger Digital Shadows, and Biggest Growth in the Far East" (sponsored by EMC) projects that the digital universe will reach 40 zettabytes by 2020. Enterprise data and content increasingly needs to be tracked, retained and managed for compliance with privacy regulations, e-discovery requirements and other information policies - leading to increasing amounts of information.

EMC's extensive information intelligence solution portfolio supports a broad range of operating systems, databases, application servers and enterprise applications that enable content management, process management, customer communications, collaboration as well as pervasive governance capabilities.

Today's defining trends are mobility, BYOD and Big Data. Do you see any other trends in this region that are hot from your perspective?

We see four major trends today - Cloud, Mobility, Big Data and Social. The confluence of these four big trends is what's changing consumer behaviour today and driving consumerisation of IT. On average, people tend to have between three to seven devices - from smartphones, tablets, PC - to access their data. These users also typically want to easily share this data with collaborators internally and externally across the organisational ecosystem. However, this can be particularly challenging when they are using their own mobile devices or need to share with users who do not have existing accounts on their corporate network.

With consumerisation of IT, business users are increasing leveraging apps in the consumer space that help them be more productive, especially when it comes to the ease of sharing files through various SaaS providers. This results in shifting the ownership from the organisation to the individual. In the event that the individual leaves the organisation, the data also leaves with the individual, including sensitive information.

As IT teams are charged with protecting company files and data, some view today's consumer-oriented approaches for online file sharing as unattractive options, and attempt to block them because some cloud infrastructures limit the ability to enforce policies related to security and administration. In addition, many organisations must also comply with longstanding corporate governance and data sovereignty policies regarding storage and handling of files that make cloud-based storage solutions difficult to deploy at enterprise-scale. As such, enterprise sync and share solutions are increasingly demanded by companies in response to the proliferation of mobile, social and cloud computing.

 

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