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Create a simple collage in Photoshop, Elements, and Pixelmator

Lesa Snider | June 16, 2015
One of the many superpowers of image editing apps that support layers is the ability to combine images into a collage. In this column, you'll learn to create the ever-popular, oh-so-romantic, soft oval vignette collage in Adobe Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, and Pixelmator. (Sorry, you can't do this workflow in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom or Apple's Photos, iPhoto, or Aperture.) This technique is perhaps the easiest--and most romantic--way to combine two images into a new and unique piece of art.

One of the many superpowers of image editing apps that support layers is the ability to combine images into a collage. In this column, you'll learn to create the ever-popular, oh-so-romantic, soft oval vignette collage in Adobe Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, and Pixelmator. (Sorry, you can't do this workflow in Adobe Photoshop Lightroom or Apple's Photos, iPhoto, or Aperture.) This technique is perhaps the easiest — and most romantic — way to combine two images into a new and unique piece of art.

To get started, you'll need to open two images and combine them into the same document. In any of the three apps, open two images (in Elements, make sure you're in Expert or Full Edit mode). Activate the document that contains the soon-to-vignetted photo and then press Command-A to select it. Press Command-C to copy it to your Mac's memory and then activate the other document and press Command-V to paste the copied image. When you do, the image lands on its very own layer. Make sure the new layer lives at the top of the layer stack (just drag it to the top if necessary).

Create an oval selection

From the Tools panel, grab the Elliptical Marquee tool. Peek at your Layers panel to make sure the correct image layer is active (the girls), and then — in the main document window — position your cursor near the center of the image. Press and hold the Option key, and then drag to draw an oval-shaped selection from the inside out.

To reposition the oval selection while you're drawing it (meaning you haven't let go of your mouse button yet), press and hold the spacebar and drag with your mouse. When you've got the selection just right, release the Option key and your mouse button.

Feather the selection

In Elements, click Refine Edge in the Options bar at the bottom of the workspace. In Pixelmator, choose Edit > Refine Selection. In Photoshop, just hang tight — we'll feather the mask (instead of the selection) in a minute. In the resulting dialog box, drag the Feather slider rightward until the feather preview looks good to you. In Elements, choose Selection from the menu at the bottom of the dialog box, and then click OK in both apps.

Add a layer mask

Hide the area outside the selection with a layer mask. You could inverse the selection and then delete the area outside it, but that'd be mighty reckless. What if you changed your mind? You'd have to undo several steps or start over completely.

A less destructive and more flexible approach is to hide the area outside the selection with a layer mask. To add a mask in Photoshop and Elements, locate the Layers panel and then click the circle-within-a-square icon (it's at the bottom of the panel in Photoshop and at the top of the panel in Elements). In Pixelmator, click the gear icon at the bottom of the Layers panel and choose Add Layer Mask from the resulting menu. Get rid of the selection by pressing Command-D in all three apps.

 

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