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Chef muscles up with Microsoft, Amazon

Joab Jackson | Sept. 9, 2014
Chef, a popular open source software program for managing the configuration settings of servers, software and other IT components, now can reach deeper into the data center with the help of some intertwined services from Microsoft, VMware and Amazon Web Services (AWS).

Previously, the software came in two editions, the open source community edition that was available at no cost, and a separate commercially supported edition with additional management features.

The company now just offers a single edition of the software, with all the capabilities included in the package. Users can download a single package at no cost, and just use the core free of charge, or turn on the premium features with a paid subscription.

"We wanted to create a single code base so everyone can download Chef," said Barry Crist, Chef CEO. Previously, companies that wanted to move between the free and commercial installations had to reinstall the software.

Premium features include analytics, federation, management console reporting and a set of Chef development tools.

Chef now comes in three editions.

Chef Essentials is the free edition. The premium features can be turned on at no cost for up to 25 nodes, and up to five nodes for the version that Chef, the company, itself offers as a hosted service.

The standard Chef subscription starts at US$6 per node per month.

A premium annual license agreement, called Chef Enterprise, provides additional hours of support and assistance in building Chef recipes, among other perks.

Also with this release, a couple of features that used to come with the paid edition are now available for free, namely support for multitenancy and role-based access control.

 

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