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Big Data confusion slows BI spending

Brian Karlovsky | Dec. 17, 2013
Big Data confusion will constrain spending on business intelligence and analytics software to single digit growth for the next two years, according to Gartner.

Big Data confusion will constrain spending on business intelligence and analytics software to single digit growth for the next two years, according to Gartner.

However, the CIO focus on BI looks set to continue and Gartner has mapped out the progress of the proliferation of Big Data, giving key predictions until 2017.

Gartner said that the benefits of fact-based decision-making are clear to business managers in a broad range of disciplines, including: marketing, sales, supply chain management, manufacturing, engineering, risk management, finance and HR. Managing vice president, Ian Bertram, said major changes were imminent in the world of BI and analytics including the dominance of data discovery techniques, wider use of real-time streaming event data and the eventual acceleration in BI and analytics spending when big data finally matures.

"As the cost of acquiring, storing and managing data continues to fall, companies are finding it practical to apply BI and analytics in a far wider range of situations," he said.

But despite the strong interest in BI and analytics, confusion around big data is inhibiting spending on BI and analytics software.

Until 2016, service providers will garner business by closing the gap between available big data technology and business cases.

As big data matures and more packaged intellectual property is available, big data analytics will become more relevant, mainstream and, ultimately, hugely disruptive. Recent Gartner surveys show that only 30 percent of organizations have invested in big data, of which only a quarter (eight percent of the total) have made it into production.

This leaves room for substantial future growth. Analytics plays squarely into the big data trend, where the growing volume, velocity and variety of data create opportunities outside of the traditional, established BI domains and buying centers. However, that also makes the sourcing of analytics bigger and more technically complex than what has been done before. Paradoxically, the confusion that surrounds the "big data" term and the uncertainty about the tangible benefits of big data are partially to blame for the soft BI and analytics market.

Procurement cycles have slowed while budget holders try to match the right tooling to the right business case.

In the interim, BI and analytics continue to remain at the forefront for CIOs, and service providers will attempt to bridge much of the confusion.

The gap will completely close when those services will become targeted and packaged.

This, in addition to a confluence of technology maturity cycles, is expected to occur around 2016.

Beyond 2016, when the discussion has matured from technology to business, and when there will be more off-the-shelf capability available, big data analytics will pervade almost everything that we do, helping push society unequivocally into the digital age. But by 2015, the majority of BI vendors will make data discovery their prime BI platform offering, shifting BI emphasis from reporting-centric to analysis-centric. Over the past several years, the BI platform market has grown largely through companies investing in IT-led consolidation projects to standardize IT-centric BI platforms for large-scale systems of record. These have tended to be highly governed and centralized, where IT production reports were pushed out to managers and knowledge workers.

 

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