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Are you a CFO seeking economic analysis tools?

Jonny Evans | March 22, 2012
When you're looking at new territories or trying to make a prediction for the state of your future business, you need full-scale tools for economic analysis -- and now you can grab a suitable solution for your iPad.

When you're looking at new territories or trying to make a prediction for the state of your future business, you need full-scale tools for economic analysis -- and now you can grab a suitable solution for your iPad.

Moody's Analytics just now is introducing Dismal Scientist for the iPad, a free app that offers real-time information for over 300 economic indicators in 46 countries.

The tool should help CFOs keep track of the state of the global economy, gaining the insight they might need on potential economic risk and other data.

Moody's Analytics forecasters in the US, Europe and Asia will update the data "frequently" the company said. And, while you don't get the full insight you might find on the subscription-based Dismal Scientist website you may already use, for a good, in-depth bite-sized glance at the economic condition, this app has it.

Features included within this initial first version of the app include:

  • Coverage of more than 300 global economic indicators.
  • An abstract within 15 minutes of the release.
  • Navigational list of releases for the current day.
  • Date picker for viewing archived releases.
  • Setting for excluding the display of releases by region.

Of course, this is far from the only app you'll find out there if you happen to be in the business of economic data analysis and corporate treasury control. Even the Federal Reserve offers its FED Economic Data app, while Oppenheimer Funds offers Global Tracker, which offers its own insights in easy app format. Then there are other solutions, such as the Thomson Reuters app or the impressive, and frequently updated free Bloomberg for iPad app, which gives you easy and immediate access to the latest financial information.

For many in the business world, mobile apps such as these are replacing the PC, at least when it comes to accessing data using a lightweight connected device.

Given that spreadsheet, document creation, presentation and mind mapping apps are also available on this platform underscores the notion that Apple -- and, perhaps in future the wider mobile devices industry -- boast a growing influence within the business world.

That top-level sources are offering their information via apps brings to mind the age-old question about chickens and eggs: Which came first?

In this case, is it the apps for business and enterprise users that predated the customer demand, of the other way 'round.

In my opinion, the appearance of these solutions reflects growing user need. Business practices are changing, and the future for the work environment will be small groups of connected mobile collaborators. It will be interesting to see what happens.

 

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