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Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015 review: Extending video editing beyond the desktop

Alan Stafford | June 17, 2015
Last year, as I was sprinting down the street trying to stay ahead of six angry bulls in Pamplona, Spain, I held my phone behind me to capture some video of the experience, all the while thinking, how am I going to color-correct this video? And then I looked up at the beautiful old buildings facing the street and thought, hey, that palette would really work well with the talking-head videos I had been editing in my hotel room the night before. But how to capture those colors and reuse them? Thankfully, Adobe has solutions for these vexing problems in the latest version of its video-editing application, Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015.

Last year, as I was sprinting down the street trying to stay ahead of six angry bulls in Pamplona, Spain, I held my phone behind me to capture some video of the experience, all the while thinking, how am I going to color-correct this video? And then I looked up at the beautiful old buildings facing the street and thought, hey, that palette would really work well with the talking-head videos I had been editing in my hotel room the night before. But how to capture those colors and reuse them? Thankfully, Adobe has solutions for these vexing problems in the latest version of its video-editing application, Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2015.

Okay, so I did not run with the bulls--I was busy climbing Mt. Everest at the time--but if I had, I could have used two iOS applications, Adobe Premiere Clip and Adobe Hue CC, which attempt to expand video editing beyond the desktop. Adobe Premiere Clip has been around since last year; it allows you to make simple edits to video on your phone and then upload the composition to Premiere Pro, which will retain the edits and let you make additional ones. Hue CC is new; you can use it to take photos and capture their "looks"--color hue sets--which you can then import into Premiere CC and apply them to other videos. So, for example, you could capture a cold, cloudy beach, with its blueish, muted colors, and apply them to a nice, short video of a large bull chasing you.

Adobe's integration of these applications is not yet round-robin, though it soon will be. Now, you can create a look in Hue CC or in Premiere Pro CC, but you can only apply a stock look in Premiere Clip; you can't create or import one, though an updated version of Clip that will add these capabilities is due any day, according to Adobe.

Pick a color

You can create looks in Premiere Pro CC 2015 by using a new Lumetri Color panel. Premiere Pro picked up the Lumetri Color engine from Adobe SpeedGrade in 2013, but then, you could not create looks in Premiere Pro; you had to create them in SpeedGrade. Now, you can import and export look files in Premiere Pro, but only using the Lumetri Color panel. In the Effects panel, you will find Lumetri Presets--but you still can't add any to this list unless you use SpeedGrade.

However, if you drag a Lumetri Preset to a video on your timeline, it appears in your Effects Control panel as a Lumetri Color effect, and you can edit it there. You can access looks from your Libraries panel, which pulls from your online Creative Cloud account, but they do not show up as options in your Effects panel or even the Lumetri Color panel. They will appear in the Lumetri Color panel once you've dragged them from your Libraries panel to your timeline video. You cannot import a look by using the Lumetri Color panel; you can only do so by using the Libraries panel.

 

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