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22 free tools for data visualization and analysis

Sharon Machlis | Jan. 3, 2012
There are many tools around to help turn data into graphics, but they can carry hefty price tags.

Drawbacks: For newcomers unused to coding visualizations, it takes time to get familiar with coding and library syntax.

Skill level: Expert.

Learn more: There are a number of examples you can look at, including Red Sox-Yankees Winning Percentages Through the Years, U.S. Cities by Population and others.

Note: There are numerous other JavaScript libraries to help create visualizations, such as the recently released Data-Driven Documents and the jQuery Visualize plug-in. Six Revisions' list of 20 Fresh JavaScript Data Visualization Libraries gives you an idea of how many there are to choose from.

Google Chart Tools

What it does: Unlike Google Fusion Tables, which is a full-fledged, self-contained application for uploading and storing data, and generating charts and maps, Chart Tools is designed to visualize data residing elsewhere, such as your own website or within Google Docs.

Google offers both a Chart API using a "simple URL request to a Google chart server" for creating a static image and a Visualization API that accesses a JavaScript library for creating interactive graphics. Google offers a comparison of data size, page load, skills needed and other factors to help you decide which option to use.

For the simpler static graphics, there's a wizard to help you create a chart from some sample formats; it goes as far as helping you input data row by row, although for any decent-size data set -- say, more than half a dozen or so entries -- it makes more sense to format it in a text file.

The visualization API includes various types of charts, maps, tables and other options.

What's cool: The static image chart is reasonably easy to use and features a Live Chart Playground, which allows you to tweak code and see your results in real time.

The more robust API lets you pull data in from a Google spreadsheet. You can create icons that mix text and images for visualizations, such as this weather forecast note, and what it calls a "Google-o-meter" graphic. The Visualization API also has some of the best documentation I've seen for a JavaScript library.

Drawbacks: The static charts tool requires a bit more work than some of the other Web-based services, and it doesn't always offer lots of extras in return. And for the API, as with other JavaScript libraries, coding is required, making this more of a programming tool than an end-user business intelligence application.

Skill level: Advanced beginner to expert.

Runs on: Any Web browser.

Learn more: See Getting Started With Charts and Interactive Charts. There are also samples in the Google Visualization API Gallery.

 

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